UCROSS: A Portrait in Place

22 October – 11 December 2016

erika -osborne Split Estates oil- on linen
Image: Erika Osborne, Split Estates, 2016, oil on linen, 32 x 48 inches. Collection of the artist.


UCROSS: A Portrait in Place
22 October – 11 December 2016

CHARLIE BETTIGOLE
CYNTHIA BRINICH-LANGLOIS
BILL GILBERT
JEANETTE HART-MANN
YOSHIMI HAYASHI
JOSEPH MOUGEL
ERIKA OSBORNE
CEDRA WOOD

UCROSS: A Portrait in Place
In the summer of 2013, a group of ecologists from the Yale University School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and artists associated with Land Arts of the American West at the University of New Mexico met at the Ucross Foundation, a 20,000-acre working cattle and sheep ranch on the high plains of northeastern Wyoming. The encounter resulted in interdisciplinary collaborations that explore the environmental and social landscape of Ucross Ranch, and the art that makes up this special exhibition.

Lannan Foundation Announces a Public Exhibition

Contact: Christie Davis
Tel. 505.954.5149
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Artist reception Saturday 22 October from 5 to 7pm

Gallery hours: Saturdays and Sundays noon to 5pm or by appointment

Lannan Foundation Gallery
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM
Tel. 505.954.5149

About the Exhibition:

UCROSS: A Portrait in Place is the result of a collaboration between a group of ecologists from the Yale University School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and artists associated with Land Arts of the American West at the University of New Mexico. In the summers of 2013 and 2014, the group convened at Ucross, a foundation and residency program situated on a 20,000-acre working ranch in Wyoming, to create works on-site.

Lannan has been a lead funder of UNM’s Land Arts of the American West program since its inception in 2000. Under the program’s founder, Bill Gilbert, distinguished professor emeritus of art and ecology, LAAW has flourished as an interdisciplinary model for an arts pedagogy based in place. Conceived as a mobile arts studio, the program immerses students in the landscape of the Southwest, challenging them to make new work in situ that is responsive to both aesthetic and environmental cues.

Lannan’s presentation of UCROSS: A Portrait in Place is in part a celebration of this long-standing partnership and in part recognition of Professor Gilbert’s contributions as he retires from his post, passing the reins to Subhankar Banerjee, another outstanding leader in the field of art and ecology with whom Lannan has a long history.

A color catalog with artists’ statements and biographies, published by the Ucross Foundation, may be viewed at the Ucross Foundation website.


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(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(INFRA) STRUCTURE: complex, below and further on - Lannan Foundation

(INFRA) STRUCTURE: complex, below and further on

16 July – 29 August 2016

Olivo Barbieri Niagara
Image: Olivo Barbieri, The Waterfall Project, Niagara Falls, Canada/US, 2007, inkjet print on archival paper, 14 x 17 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

Click an artist’s name to read the biography.

Siah Armajani
Olivo Barbieri
John Cliett
Christine Corday
Michael Heizer
Joanne Lefrak
Laura Letinsky
Pard Morrison
Trevor Paglen
Victoria Sambunaris
Fred Sandback
Josef Schulz
Christina Seely
Guy Tillim

Lannan Foundation Announces a Public Exhibition

Contact: Christie Davis
Tel. 505.954.5149
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Gallery Hours: Saturdays and Sundays noon to 5pm or by appointment

Opening Reception: Saturday 16 July from 5 to 7 pm

Lannan Foundation Gallery
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM

About the Exhibition

(Infra) Structure is an exhibition of artwork in the Lannan Collection examining the notion of structure. Photographs of buildings, train tracks, and internet cables are presented with architectural renderings, dreamed-up gardens, and a model of a make-believe house. Images of monumental land art projects and a drawing of a massive sculpture face a city in miniature and a tabletop askew. Looking at the ways in which artists take structural foundations and record, rearrange, or imagine them anew, (Infra) Structure reminds us of the depth of human ingenuity.

Click here to jump down to the Installation View photos.


Laura Letinsky, Untitled #55 (vases)</p>
</e, 2014

Image: Laura Letinsky, Untitled #55 (vases), 2014, archival pigment print, 50 x 40 inches, edition 2 of 9, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Still life photographer Laura Letinsky uses the dining table as a focal point, assembling objects and food in minimalist, altar-like arrangements. Influenced by seventeenth-century Dutch-Flemish still life painting, her work always presents a sense of “after the fact.” Her images are not of a dinner party in full swing but rather the aftermath and detritus of a memorable gathering. Objects and food are not always recognizable, but there is a definite sense of what was, as if from an archaeological dig. With the table as the foundation, almost like a canvas, we witness scenes from the morning after. Letinsky’s more recent work moves away from a literal portrayal of the table into images that play with space and dimension. With this shift, she incorporates paper cutouts of professionally photographed food and tableware from lifestyle magazines. Combining three-dimensional forms with two-dimensional spaces, Letinsky’s work gives the viewer an uneasy sense, as if the floor were tilted and what you see might just slide off the surface. Of her III Form and Void Full series, from which this work comes, she said, “Making this work is for me about building a world I can live—believe—in, and living—believing—in a world I can build. It’s ‘all I got . . . (but it’s a lot),’ to quote some inane pop song from the 70s.”


Pard Morrison, Invisible Hand, 2015

Image: Pard Morrison, Invisible Hands, 2014, fired pigment on aluminum, 15 ½ x 24 x 2 ¼ inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Also playing with perspective, Pard Morrison’s aluminum fabrications are based on a rational, geometric foundation, using color to denote depth and space. Morrison describes his work as “momentary portraits of systems that are in flux.” Appearing both solid and apparitional at once, the likeness to something engineered and purposeful is displaced by the awareness that the viewer’s optical perception plays a key role in how the object is recognized. The artist explains, “My interest lies in the exploration of this intersection: the intersection of pictorial illusion and specific object, and the marriage of both. I hope to create work that upon first encounter primarily reads as artificially fabricated but upon further investigation, the visual strength of its own ‘objectness’ is compromised by specific human mark-making.”


Josef Schulz, unoe 03, 2009
Image: Josef Schulz, unoe 03, 2009, archival pigment print, 11 ¾ x 15 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

In the photographs of Josef Schulz we are reminded of the physical traces of borders and how architecture can be a distinct demarcation between one country and another. For his Übergang (German for “crossing”) series, Schulz photographed disused military checkpoints and border stations across Europe. After the establishment of the European Union, many highly guarded borders became irrelevant. In photographing these empty symbols of divide, the artist draws attention to the physical traces of borders—many of which no longer exist—and how difficult they are to erase. He explains, “Borders were lines, drawn not only across territories but also through our heads.” Making the architectural structure the primary focus, Schulz digitally manipulates the image to blur the background, slightly removing it from its physical location and making the landscape unspecific and exchangeable. Schulz states that his work is personally significant: “I grew up in Poland, a country whose territory has been repeatedly redefined in the course of history. The border police have now disappeared from our frontiers too, and the border stations seem quite harmless today—but they will continue to conjure up unsettling images in our minds for many years to come.”


Olivo Barbieri Niagara
Image: Olivo Barbieri, The Waterfall Project, Niagara Falls, Canada/USA, 2007, inkjet print on archival paper, 14 x 17 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Olivo Barbieri makes photographs using a tilt-shift lens, portraying cities such as New York, Las Vegas, Shanghai, and Rome in miniature. By simulating a shallow depth of field, this technique gradually blurs the top and bottom or left and right edges of the image, creating a radiating center focus. The resulting urban portraits render their subjects in miniature, making some of the world’s biggest cities look like models. Barbieri’s photographs are taken from a helicopter, giving him a rare bird’s-eye view, like Gulliver observing the Lilliputians. The artist works in series and has created groups of work based on cities, beaches, mountains, and waterfalls. In The Waterfall Project, Barbieri traveled to some of the world’s most awe-inspiring falls, such as Victoria (Zambia/Zimbabwe), Iguazu (Argentina/Brazil), and Khone Papeng (Laos/Cambodia). In the case of Niagara Falls (Canada/USA), through Barbieri’s lens, one of North America’s most daunting and awe-inspiring natural wonders becomes charming and amusement park–like.


Aerial survey photograph of Michael Heizer's The City (Aerial Photograph of
Image: Aerial survey photograph of Michael Heizer’s The City (Aerial Photograph of “The City Complex” Showing Land Owned by Triple Aught), 2008, C-print, 24 x 37 inches each, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Michael Heizer said, “I think earth is the material with the most potential because it is the original source material.” As a leading artist in the land art movement, Heizer has been intervening in the landscape since the late 1960s. Influenced by his anthropologist father and geologist grandfather, Heizer had his first solo exhibition at the Galerie Heiner Freidrich in Germany in 1969. For that show he excavated 1,000 tons of earth in a conical shape to form the Munich Depression. In 1970 Heizer completed Double Negative, consisting of two trenches created by displacing 240,000 tons of rock at Mormon Mesa, Nevada. Of the project he said, “There is nothing there, yet it is still a sculpture.” In 1972 Heizer began construction for another enormous work, City, a lifelong project in the desert of Lincoln County, Nevada. As Heizer said of City, “I’m building this work for later. I’m interested in making a work of art that will represent all the civilization to this point.” Covering territory approximately a mile and a quarter long by more than three-quarters of a mile wide, akin to the size of the National Mall in Washington, DC, Heizer’s sculpture takes inspiration from the ancient city of Chichen Itza. This aerial photograph of the project illustrates its massive size and harmony with the landscape.


Field before the Storm, Walter de Maria's Lightning Field, 1977
Image: John Cliett, Field before the Storm, Walter de Maria’s Lightning Field, 1977, chromogenic print, 25 x 44 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Another artist who created a monumental installation in the American West is Walter de Maria. His 1977 The Lightning Field consists of 400 steel poles—each 2 inches in diameter and averaging 20 feet, 7½ inches in height and spaced 220 feet apart—arranged in a grid formation measuring 1 mile by 1 kilometer near Quemado, New Mexico. The height of each pole is adjusted for the topography so that the tips meet on the same visual plane. John Cliett is a New York–based photographer perhaps best known for his work with de Maria on The Lightning Field. Commissioned by the artist and the Dia Art Foundation in New York, Cliett produced a series of more than 100 photographs of de Maria’s land art creation. Created in 1978 and 1979, Cliett’s images remain the most reproduced and striking documentation of de Maria’s monumental installation. He explained, “My goal was a very competitive one, which was to make pictures that were so astounding that nobody would ever be able to make a better one. That the pictures would overwhelm the work: that was my goal.”


Lux: Metropolis 35° 10'N 136° 50'E (Nagoya), 2005–2008
Image: Christina Seely, Lux: Metropolis 35° 10’N 136° 50’E (Nagoya), 2005–2008, digital C-print, 14 x 11 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Rather than documenting the light created by the sun and lightning, Christina Seely‘s project Lux illuminates the connection between artificial light and beauty and how it is manifested on earth’s surface. Using NASA maps, Seely identified 45 of the most brightly lit cities in the United States, Europe, China, and Japan and then visited them to make her own recording of their particular glow. Named after the unit for measuring illumination, Lux very clearly distinguishes the hot spots of economically and politically powerful regions on the planet, whose glare is staggering in comparison to countries and continents that lie in almost total darkness. While Seely does identify cities and she titles her works based on longitudinal and latitudinal degrees, each title also includes the term metropolis, establishing the body of work as being less about individual countries and more about a region’s global impact on the planet’s shared ecology and limited resources.


KNOUN d2, 2007
Image: Christine Corday, KNOUN d2, 2007, charcoal on newsprint, 9 x 12 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Christine Corday has combined her interests in the sciences and fine arts to paint, sculpt, draw, and design. Her work includes metal alloy sculptures called the Protoist Series, designed to change and rust with human interaction (the first was displayed under the High Line in New York City); the black iron oxide selected to cover the National September 11 Memorial; abstract charcoal drawings; and abstract synthetic polymer and pigment paintings. This charcoal rendering on newsprint shows KNOUN, one of two massive torch-cut steel sculptures realized by Corday. Debuting at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2015, KNOUN is a two-pillar form with a base and a height of 13 feet that investigates balance and gravity. The term protoist, coined by the artist, is meant to describe forms in and out of a solid state. About her Protoist Series, Corday writes, “Human scale has always been of great interest to my work. . . . The function of sensory perception is to bring an unknown into definition. . . . Human scale is a chosen moment in the awareness of this perceptive function—this is the work of the Protoist Series.”


Trinity Site, 2013
Image: Joanne Lefrak, Trinity Site, 2013, scratched Plexiglas and shadow, 14 x 74 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Joanne Lefrak makes drawings of places that are deeply embedded with history and meaning, such as spiritual and healing sites, pilgrimage sites, and ghost towns. No writing instruments or paper are involved in her drawings. Rather Lefrak scratches lines into Plexiglas, making an image apparent as a shadow on the surface behind it. Like etchings, the images are richly detailed, and the shadow effect lends depth to create a sense of infinite space. Trinity Site, in southern New Mexico, is the subject of a series of landscapes by Lefrak. She explains, “At first I was attracted to the historical narrative of the Trinity Site because . . . the resulting landscape after the atomic bomb was detonated is a kind of a physically ‘empty’ landscape yet completely not empty at the same time when considered within the context of our historical and current collective ideas of war.” Indeed, this landscape reveals little or nothing about the military-industrial complex that created it and has used it as a place of advancing weapons of mass destruction. In Trinity Site (2013) the only sign of humankind in the landscape is a barbed-wire fence.


Study of Installation—Galerie Heiner Friedrich, 1971
Image: Fred Sandback, Study of Installation—Galerie Heiner Friedrich, 1971, lithographs on yellow paper, 15 ½ x 19 inches each, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Similarly delicate lines are seen in the work of Fred Sandback, whose minimalist sculptures outline planes and volumes in space by simply dissecting a room with colored yarn. With discreetly affixed ends, the yarn appears to come from within the wall or floor, stretching from one surface to another, creating the illusion of glass-like planes outlined in color. Like other artists in the minimalist movement, Sandback wanted to eschew symbolic references and recognizable imagery in his work and replace them with the here-and-now experience of moving through space. Describing the work, Sandback said that he left “discrete sculptural volumes for a sculpture which becomes less of a thing in itself, more of a diffuse interface between myself, my environment, and others peopling that environment, built of thin lines that left enough room to move through and around. Still sculpture, though less dense, with an ambivalence between exterior and interior. A drawing that is habitable.” All his “inhabitable drawings” originated as physical marks on paper in studies the artist produced. Presented in the exhibition are the artist’s imagined installations for German gallerist Heiner Friedrich in 1971 (not shown) and a 1989 design for the Dia Art Foundation in New York.


Fallujah model, 2004–2005
Image: Siah Armajani, Fallujah model, 2004–2005, basswood, plastic, copper wire, and fabric, 19 ¼ x 16 x 16 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Iranian sculptor Siah Armajani has been living and making work in the United States for more than 50 years. Forced to leave his country in 1960 during the reign of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, Armajani subsequently made artwork based in architecture with themes inspired by literature, politics, war, and issues of social justice. His projects have ranged from public sculptural commissions—such as the Gazebo for Two Anarchists at Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, New York, and Bridge for Iowa City at the University of Iowa—to smaller, more intimate works on paper. In 1996 Lannan commissioned The Poetry Garden for the courtyard of its Los Angeles museum; a drawing of the piece is included in this exhibition.  Although much of his early work deals with utopian themes, often linked to American history, Armajani has more recently referred to his region of birth in the aftermath of the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2007 the Foundation purchased one of Armajani’s most compelling works, Fallujah: a multilevel glass structure (measuring roughly 16 x 10 x 12 feet) created in homage to Pablo Picasso’s 1937 antiwar painting Guernica, which the artist compared to the death and destruction of the Iraq War. Lannan donated the monumental piece to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in 2011 but still possesses a version of the piece in model form. Throughout Armajani’s career, his goal has been to link different kinds of structures with their political, philosophical, and ethical implications.


Written Minneapolis (The Last Tomb), 2014
Image: Siah Armajani, Written Minneapolis (The Last Tomb), 2014, felt pen on Mylar,
36 x 222 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

A centerpiece of the (Infra) Structure exhibition is Armajani’s epic drawing Written Minneapolis (The Last Tomb), 2014. This felt-pen-on-Mylar drawing measures 36 inches high by an impressive 222 inches long. In a love letter to both his hometown of Tehran and his adoptive home, Armajani portrays Minneapolis with its vernacular architecture and an air that is distinctly midwestern. Created on a specially made tilted work space in his studio, the scroll-like drawing is rich with shading and detail, all created using text written in the artist’s native Persian.

Of this work Armajani wrote:

Among the works in this exhibition is Written Minneapolis (The Last Tomb), 2014. It is 18 feet long and a mix of writings and drawings of the neighborhood of my place of work.

At the end of the nineteenth century and into the first two decades of the twentieth, this part of Minneapolis was developed to be used for warehouses and light industry. By now, the neighborhood has morphed from its early years of grain elevators into a mixed use of storage houses, residential, and crisscrossed with railroad tracks, some useful and some useless.

Written Minneapolis (The Last Tomb) is a crooked memory of my childhood and adolescence in Tehran, and then later on after I came to Minneapolis. Empty spaces were filled with poetry that I had to memorize as a student . . . some Persian and some impromptu translations by my teacher of French symbolist poets.


NSA-Tapped Fiber Optic Cable Landing Site, Morro Bay, California, United States, 2015
Image: Trevor Paglen, NSA-Tapped Fiber Optic Cable Landing Site, Morro Bay, California, United States, 2015, C-print and mixed media on navigational chart, C-print image 48 x 60 inches, map image 48 x 56 7/8 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

The work of photographer Trevor Paglen deliberately blurs the lines between science, contemporary art, journalism, and other disciplines to fashion painstaking and unknown research methods to decipher the world in which we live. His subjects include experimental geography, state secrecy, military symbology, and visuality. The images presented in this exhibition are from the artist’s series on the geography and aesthetics of the National Security Agency’s global surveillance program. For this body of work, Paglen visited shoreline sites and underwater locales where the NSA has tapped transoceanic cables. Contrary to popular belief, personal communications and data are not transmitted in thin air via a “cloud.” Rather information is passed from one part of the globe to another via an intricate underwater cable system that the NSA monitors regularly at designated choke points. Coupled with collages of maritime maps and documents revealing their status as NSA surveilled locations (like this one at Morro Bay, California), Paglen’s banal seascapes reveal to the viewer just how little we know about what goes on below the surface. Learning to scuba dive, Paglen extended his work to the ocean floor, documenting the vulnerable and very much physical infrastructure that global communications depend on, such as this internet cable in the Bahamas.


Untitled (Distant Train with Plains, Gillette, Wyoming, 2001
Image: Victoria Sambunaris,Untitled (Distant Train with Plains, Gillette, Wyoming), 2001, C-print, 39 x 55 inches, edition 1 of 5, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Victoria Sambunaris has also documented American infrastructure, with trains and highways figuring prominently in her work. Nearly every year since 1999, Sambunaris has set out from her home in New York to cross the United States by car, alone, with her camera. In a piece for LightBox, TIME‘s photo blog, she explained her frame of mind when on the road: “Once I am rolling down the road, there’s a feeling of anticipation as I wonder about what lies ahead. The seemingly enormous inner turmoil over leaving New York is purged—a sort of ritualistic cleansing as I transition to the road. The monotony of the interstate, soon enough, becomes familiar and comforting once again. Driving it requires patience—looking and waiting—similar to the act of taking a picture. I watch the world pass across my windshield with time to think, look and listen. The Mississippi River has become a kind of first milestone for me; when I cross it, my state of mind shifts and the world slows down. In the car, I listen to the radio, the truckers on the CB or maybe some Led Zeppelin—a regular on my playlist. It keeps things lively.” Her photographs capture the expansive American landscape and the human-made and natural adaptations that intersect it, including trains in Texas and Wyoming, trucks in New Jersey and Wisconsin, the oil pipeline in Alaska, salt flats and mines in Utah, and images of the wall along the US–Mexico border. Combined, they present a sparse and vast landscape, dotted by human intervention, that is distinctly American. Sambunaris’s work in this exhibition celebrates the train, a symbol of western expansion for almost two centuries and a subject the artist has lovingly photographed and videotaped for more than 15 years.


Jo'burg: Al's Tower, a Block of Flats on Harrow Road, Berea, Overlooking the Ponte Building, 2004
Image: Guy Tillim, Jo’burg: Al’s Tower, a Block of Flats on Harrow Road, Berea, Overlooking the Ponte Building, 2004, archival pigment ink on cotton paper, 19 ½ x 28 ¼ inches, edition 1 of 5, Collection Lannan Foundation.

In direct contrast to the idealized or utopian cityscapes of Barbieri and Armajani are Guy Tillim‘s grave portraits of contemporary African cities. Born in South Africa, Tillim worked as a photojournalist for news agencies such as Reuters and Agence France-Presse for more than a decade before making the switch to fine art photography. Primarily working in sub-Saharan Africa, Tillim has created several bodies of work that examine the legacy of colonialism, especially as exhibited in architecture. For his series Jo’berg, Tillim roamed Johannesburg’s dense and decaying neighborhood of Hillbrow, an area dramatically affected by social and political changes during South Africa’s transition out of apartheid. Crowded, dirty, and seemingly uninhabitable, the old apartment buildings and crumbling skyscrapers in Tillim’s images reveal living conditions for contemporary Africans that are nearly apocalyptical. Initially a “white only” area, Hillbrow began in the 1970s to become home to waves of poor from the townships and to African immigrants from surrounding war-torn and economically challenged nations. Parts of Johannesburg, once considered the “New York of Africa,” are now the nation’s most dangerous and feared neighborhoods. In Tillim’s images, we see a startling portrait of modernism where the promise of concrete, steel, and glass has given away to a poverty, crime, and a broken social contract.

—Christie Davis, Program Director for Art


Installation View

Click on any image below to view larger. Use the arrows for previous-next.

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

(Infra) Structure: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

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A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection - Lannan Foundation

A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection

30 January – 6 March 2016

Visit with Old Friends, Installation View, photo by Addison Doty, Lannan Foundation
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

Click an artist’s name to read the biography.

John Baldessari
John Battenberg
Rackstraw Downes
Anselm Kiefer
Sol LeWitt
Morris Louis
Robert Moskowitz
Isamu Noguchi
Pat Steir
Robert Therrien

Lannan Foundation Announces a Public Exhibition
Contact: Christie Davis
Tel. 505.954.5149
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Gallery Hours: Saturdays and Sundays noon to 5pm or by appointment

Lannan Foundation Gallery
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM

About the Exhibition

Spanning more than 50 years, A Visit with Old Friends is an intimate exhibit of artworks long loved in the Lannan Collection. The oldest piece in the exhibition is a large drawing by Isamu Noguchi from 1930, with text from 1938, created in response to war. Some of the artwork in the exhibition was gifted to the Foundation, a result of the generous support that our founder, J. Patrick Lannan Sr., bestowed on so many of the artists he knew in his lifetime. Like old friends, we welcome time with these artworks again and again. 

Click here to jump down to the Installation View photos.


mother and child by isamu noguchiImage: Isamu Noguchi, Mother and Child, 1930 (text 1938), ink on paper, 75 x 41 ¼ inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Mother and Child

From great China we once learned
the art of life.
now with western tools, apt
pupils, we torture the earth
that gave so much.
But China’s future is in her
children who growing into manhood
in times like these gain character
to love justice and resist
tyranny.

—Isamu Noguchi, 1938

In 1930 Isamu Noguchi traveled on the Trans-Siberian Railroad toward Japan, where he hoped to reconcile with his estranged father. The 26-year-old stopped en route in Beijing, where he studied for eight months with celebrated Chinese brush-and-ink master Qi Baishi. During that period, Noguchi made many large ink-on-paper works, a few of which he entitled Mother and Child. Noguchi donated this version to an auction in New York in 1937 in support of the Chinese Women’s Relief Association for its charitable work in war-torn China.

The highest bid came from a wealthy Chinese businessman, K. C. Li, on the condition that Noguchi explain why he, a Japanese American, would choose to help the Chinese. Noguchi shared, “I give this drawing as my way of showing the world that not all Japanese are militaristic.” It was at this time that Noguchi added the poem in honor of China, directly on the artwork. Approximately 20 years later, Li made a gift of the work to J. Patrick Lannan Sr., who went on to collect several more Noguchi drawings and sculptures, establishing a friendship with the artist along the way. Of the many letters between the two, one to Noguchi from Lannan in 1983 reads, “I can say no one, of all the painters and sculptors I have met, match you in accomplishments. You are the Master, always and always.”


John Battenberg, A Swelling Is
Image: John Battenberg, A Swelling Is, 1956, cast bronze, 2 x 11 ½ x 9 5/8 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Also received as a gift, John Battenberg’s heavily textured sculpture A Swelling Is (1956) takes its name from a love letter featured in the center of the work, which begins, “Darling, I can’t tell you how much I miss you.” The cast-bronze work re-creates a scene from World War II, pairing the love letter with a pilot’s glove and a pack of Turkish blend cigarettes. The portion of the letter that is legible reads:

Darling
I can’t tell you how
Much I miss you
My nights are very
Lonesome without
. . . Giving you what
I can only give once
I want you to know
that I am not sorry
A swelling has grown
In my tummy that will
Keep us together


Morris Louis, Untitled, 1954Image: Morris Louis, Untitled, 1954, oil on canvas, 96 ½ x 72 ½ inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Perhaps most famously known for his Veil paintings, color field painter Morris Louis worked in series, often creating more than 100 works with a set motif and palette. Painted in 1954, the same year as the Veil paintings, this work exhibits a similarly unprimed canvas stained with color by paint, but with much bolder colors and with brushstrokes that move in a variety of directions. This and five other paintings were purchased directly from Louis in 1959. A Lannan family member recalls that all were unstretched canvases and that they initially lived under the bed in Patrick Lannan Sr.’s Park Avenue apartment.


Pat Steir, The Virgin's Dream

Image: Pat Steir, The Virgin’s Dream, 1972, oil and pencil on canvas, 95 ½ x 72 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Water, water, water, water . . . the word, written in pencil, is repeated 12 times across the center of Pat Steir’s The Virgin’s Dream (1972). Purchased in 1973, the stately painting marries a feeling of Jungian dream imagery and color with rational line and measurement. Created one year after Steir visited New Mexico to meet Agnes Martin, the canvas is covered by an enormous grid, like a giant piece of ledger paper. At the top of the painting we see a bird, a reference to the artist’s pet, John Cage (named in homage to the composer), also seen in other paintings from this period. Perhaps made as a final gesture, a huge black X covers the canvas, as if to cancel it out.


Robert Moskowitz, Untitled, 1972Image: Robert Moskowitz, Untitled, 1972, acrylic on canvas, 90 1/8 x 75 1/8 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Also purchased in 1973 was Robert Moskowitz’s equally grand painting Untitled (1972). For 10 years, beginning in about 1967, every painting Moskowitz created was on this size canvas, an impressive 90 x 73 inches. In a letter from curator Ned Rifkin, dated December 9, 1988, he shares something about how the painting entered the Lannan Collection, writing, “Bob [Moskowitz] remembers Patrick [Lannan Sr.] coming to his studio with Mary McFadden and possibly Nancy Hoffman, who represented him at that time.”


Sol Lewitt, Straight Lines

Sol Lewitt, Straight lines



Images: Sol LeWitt, Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn at random, within a square, using four directions of line, 1) vertical 2) horizontal 3) diagonal, left to right 4) diagonal, right to left and all combinations of those lines, c. 1971, Collection Lannan Foundation.

The connection between Lannan and artist Sol LeWitt goes back several decades to when the Foundation first collected his work, a small sculpture, B 2-5-8(s) (1967), later gifted to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. In 1986 the Foundation commissioned a LeWitt wall drawing for its Lake Worth Museum. This pair of Sol LeWitt etchings was brought into the collection in 2005, and in typical LeWitt fashion, the title reveals the formula for its creation. Most recently, Lannan helped support the exhibition Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt at the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin.


Robert Thierren, No title (snowman)
Image: Robert Therrien, No Title (snowman), 1987, cast bronze, 35 x 35 x 15 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Along with plates, tables, and chairs, the snowman is an often-repeated figure in Robert Therrien’s work, a happy reminder of a favorite pastime for children in cold environs. Therrien has duplicated this familiar image in a multitude of media, from paint to plaster, and in a variety of metals, including bronze, zinc, silver, tin, and nickel. Discussing his most used images Therrien explained, “The third important shape is the snowman. It becomes a metaphor for myself or for a figurative image. It is the closest to a human figure, myself or a man. To me, it is the basic gesture for a figure. It has unlimited references. It fluctuates between the abstract and the real.” Lannan’s No Title (snowman), from 1987, was commissioned by the Foundation nearly 30 years ago to sit outside its first museum space in tropical Lake Worth, Florida.


Anselm Kiefer, Der Ritt and Die Weichel, 1976
Image: Anselm Kiefer, Der Ritt An Die Weichel (Ride to the Vistula), 1976, oil on linen, 52 x 69 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

After the death of the Foundation’s founder, J. Patrick Lannan Sr., his son Patrick Lannan assumed leadership and the museum was moved to a new home in Los Angeles, where an ambitious collecting program was begun. Purchased in 1992, Kiefer’s painting Der Ritt An Die Weichel (Ride to the Vistula), refers to Hitler’s march into Poland in 1939. The Vistula, Poland’s longest and largest river, is a feature in many of the country’s legends and has been one of its main trading arteries for hundreds of years. At the time of the German invasion, Poland’s only defense was its cavalry. A symbol used repeatedly in Kiefer’s work, the horse represents Poland, which was doomed trying to defend itself from modern tanks with gentle animals.

This piece was acquired a few years after the Foundation’s board of directors was introduced to Kiefer’s work and made a significant grant in support of his first US retrospective. Organized in 1988 by the Art Institute of Chicago and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the show went on to travel to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. In a review of the exhibition for Time, the late art critic Robert Hughes said that Kiefer’s work was “a victory for the moral imagination.”


John Baldessari, X meets the U S Mail

Image: John Baldessari, X sign meets the ★ U.S. Mail ★, 1962, oil on wood, 22 ¼ x 20 1/8 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

John Baldessari’s X sign meets the ★ U.S. Mail ★ (1962), also purchased in 1992, is an example of the artist’s early experimentations with assemblage, which created an opportunity for him to move beyond the restrictions of a flat canvas. The work in Lannan’s collection, one of several pieces made at this time, is a rare surviving example, as most of his work made prior to 1966 was destroyed in a performance piece in which Baldessari and five of his friends burned all the paintings he had created between 1953 and 1966. The resulting Cremation Project was created from the ashes, which were baked into cookies and placed in an urn. A commemorative plaque listed the destroyed paintings’ birth and death dates, as well as a recipe for the cookies. Though this work differs in style greatly from the artist’s more well-known reductive conceptual work of the last few decades, the use of words is in keeping with his interest in language.


Rackstraw Jones, Snug Harbor Metal Ductwork in G Attic
Rackstraw Jones, Snug Harbor Metal Ductwork in G Attic
Rackstraw Jones, Snug Harbor Metal Ductwork in G Attic
Rackstraw Jones, Snug Harbor Metal Ductwork in G Attic

Image: Rackstraw Downes, Snug Harbor, Metal Duct Work in G Attic, 2001, oil on canvas in four parts, 15 ¼ x 170 ¾ inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

In the 1960s, Rackstraw Downes moved away from the abstract style popular at the time toward a more realistic, even superreal, interpretation of common sights, such as street scenes, banal interiors, and utilitarian landscapes. Often painting over a period of months or even years, Downes meticulously records the details of his chosen scene as perceived at a specific time of day. Rare for his plein-air method, Downes’s seemingly unremarkable scenes pull the viewer in optically through his use of altered perspective and multiple points of focus.

Of his experience painting the attic of the Snug Harbor Music Hall, Downes explained, “These were early nineteenth-century buildings with lovely brick arches and stone details, and shiny new twentieth-century ducts running through there. The contrast of tenses was very exciting to me.” The paintings were equally exciting to the Foundation’s current president, Patrick Lannan, when he first saw them on view at Betty Cunningham Gallery in New York at a solo exhibition in the fall of 2004. They were added to the Lannan Collection in 2005.

—Christie Davis, Program Director for Art


Installation Photos


Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty
Click on any image below to view larger. Use the arrows for previous-next.

A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty


A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty


A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty


A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty

A Visit with Old Friends: Selections from the Lannan Collection
Image: Lannan Foundation Installation View. Photo: Addison Doty


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James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) Chapters 4, 6, 8 - Lannan Foundation

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) Chapters 4, 6, 8

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) Chapters 4, 6 and 8

11 July – 30 August 2015

In 2012, James Drake made a commitment to draw every day for two years. The resulting 1,242 images (depicting nature, science, human anatomy, as well as scientific formulas, poetry and classical art) are arranged in a total of ten chapters, three of which are presented at Lannan.

Opening Reception with the Artist Saturday 11 July from 5 to 7pm

Artist Talk: Wednesday 5 August at 7pm Lensic Performing Arts Center FREE
James Drake and Dr. David Krakauer, President Santa Fe Institute
Read more here.

Gallery Hours: Saturdays and Sundays noon to 5pm or by appointment

Lannan Foundation Gallery
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM
Tel. 505.954.5149

james drake, detail, anatomy of drawing and space, (brain trash) chapter 4

Image: James Drake, Detail, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash), Chapter 4

About the Exhibition:

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) is the result of a two year commitment on the artist’s part to making at least one drawing every day. The resulting 1,242 drawings, each numbered in a chronological progression, take the viewer on a trip through the artist’s mind, with musings on topics from architecture to space travel, scientific formulas to poetry, and from artworks by masters from centuries past to the elaborate sign language of prison inmates and their visitors in El Paso, Texas, today.

Broken down into ten chapters, the drawings either function independently or are massed together to create a huge image, such as a crow, a flying skeleton, a gathering storm or a voluptuous female nude. Insects and animals feature prominently, with spiders and crows making repeat appearances. Phrases and words are presented in elaborate scripts or classical lettering, sharing a poetic message such as, “Can we know the sound of forgiveness,” or a simple word like “patience.” Death and violence are represented with skulls and weapons, even of mass destruction, while life is celebrated throughout, often in heartening portraits of friends and loved ones.

Merging the two seamlessly, Drake’s overall montage reminds us of life’s both dramatic and mundane beauty, and that wonder and awe should never wane.

Christie Davis, Lannan Director of Art & Public Programs

View James Drake’s bio on Lannan.org.


Click on the artwork to view enlarged versions.

Chapter 4:
Image: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) Chapter 4
Mixed media on paper, 160 drawings, each 19 x 24 inches.
Courtesy of the Artist.
james drake, chapter 4, foldout, thumbnail

Chapter 6:
Image: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) Chapter 6
Mixed media on paper, 126 drawings, each 19 x 24 inches
Courtesy of the Artist.
james drake, chapter 6 foldout, thumbnail

Chapter 8:
Image: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) Chapter 8
Mixed media on paper, 77 drawings, each 19 x 24 inches
Courtesy of the Artist.
james drake, chapter 8 foldout, thumbnail


Installation View

Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Doty
Click on the artwork to view enlarged versions.

Installation view, Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Doty

Installation view, Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Doty

Installation view, Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Doty

Installation view, Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Doty

Installation view, Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Dotyl

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Installation view, Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Doty

Installation view, Lannan Foundation: James Drake, Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash). Photos: Addison Doty


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James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space - Lannan Foundation

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space Publication
San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art

James Drake Anatomy of Drawing and Space

The San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA San Diego) received support for the 2014 publication of the catalogue James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash), which accompanied an exhibition of the same title.

The exhibition was presented at MCA San Diego and the Blanton Museum at the University of Texas at Austin in the summer and fall of 2014. The book includes essays on the artist as well as images from the installation. The project consisted of a cycle of drawings by sculptor, painter, drawer, photographer, and video artist James Drake, when the artist commissioned himself to make at least one drawing every day for two years. The resulting 1,242 images cull from his personal reservoir of images – wild animals, scientific formulas, personal portraits, and historical figures – all rendered in pencil, ink, and charcoal.

About Drake, chief curator Kathryn Kanjo of MCA San Diego writes, “He defies a ready, singular style. Instead, Drake maps a space of humanity toggling between the languages of physics and poetry, illustrated by images of current events and cultural history.”

View James Drake’s bio on Lannan.org.

Jean-Luc Mylayne: Mutual Regard Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Jean-Luc Mylayne: Mutual Regard Exhibition

Jean-Luc Mylayne: Mutual Regard Exhibition
The Art Institute of Chicago, IL

jean-luc mylayne mutual regard

In 2014, the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC) received a grant for its exhibition Jean-Luc Mylayne: Mutual Regard, scheduled to be on view at the AIC and the Arts Club Chicago from May to August 2015.

Envisioned as twin exhibitions, Mutual Regard will feature Mylayne’s captivating color photographs of birds that unite inside culture with outside nature and two Chicago institutions with profound ties to each other. In addition, plans are under way for a third portion of the presentation: a chapel-like structure, designed by Chicago architects Dan Wheeler and Joy Meek, in Millennium Park. Mylayne’s work documents birds as actors in and around human communities.

As explained by the AIC, “The photographs… can take months to prepare. Week after week, Mylayne and his life partner, Myléne Mylayne, set up cumbersome camera equipment and wait until one or more of the individual birds he has previously identified – and who often seem to recognize him in turn – come to occupy the position he had imagined in his picture.”

View Jean-Luc Mylayne’s bio on Lannan.org.

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Exhibition Tour - Lannan Foundation

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Exhibition Tour

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Exhibition Tour
Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College, Chicago, IL

victoria sambunari taxonomy of a landscape

In 2014, The Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP) at Columbia College in Chicago, IL, received support for its 2014-2015 exhibition tour of Victoria Sambunaris Taxonomy of a Landscape to cover transportation, crating, storage, travel, installation supplies, and publicity materials.

Curated by Christie Davis and consisting of photographs from the Lannan Collection, this mid-career solo exhibition has enjoyed a popular on-going tour since its debut at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY in 2011. After its presentation at MoCP in Chicago, the exhibition is scheduled to appear at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno and the University of Texas at El Paso’s Rueben Center for the Arts. Sambunaris has expressed that she has “an unrelenting curiosity to understand the American landscape and our place in it.” Her photographs examine the role we play in and with nature.

View Victoria Sambunaris’s bio on Lannan.org.

CENTER Photographic Awards, Grants, Conference - Lannan Foundation

CENTER Photographic Awards, Grants, Conference

Photographic Awards, Grants, Conference, Events, Exhibitions & Residency
CENTER, Santa Fe, NM

CENTER Santa Fe workshops

In 2014, CENTER in Santa Fe, NM, received a grant in support of its photographic awards, grants, conference, residency, events, and exhibitions.

Founded in 1994, the non-profit organization honors, supports, and provides opportunities to gifted and committed photographers. Its name implies both an action and a destination, and the organization over the past twenty years gas worked to produce a large community of photographers and an audience for these artists, participating in high quality programs. CENTER brings to Santa Fe photographers, curators, and publishers from around the world to promote the exhibition and publication of new work that expands the social, environmental, and aesthetic impact of the photographic arts.

Christina Seely: Lux Publication - Lannan Foundation

Christina Seely: Lux Publication

Christina Seely: Lux Publication
Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College, Chicago, IL

christina seeley lux

The Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP) at Columbia College in Chicago, IL, received a grant in 2014 in support of the publication Christina Seely: Lux.

The book presents photographic portraits of over 40 cities that lie in the most brightly illuminated regions of the NASA night earth map, photographed by Seely between 2005 and 2010. Lux examines the disconnect between the immense beauty created by human-made light emanating from the surface and the environmental impact of the world’s wealthiest countries. The project focuses less on the differences between individual locations and more on the worldwide effects and consequences of excessive consumption.

Aaron Huey: Mitakuye Oyasin - Lannan Foundation

Aaron Huey: Mitakuye Oyasin

Aaron Huey: Mitakuye Oyasin Second Edition Publication
Radius Books, Santa Fe, NM

aaron huey mitakuye oyasin

Radius Books received a grant in 2014 in support of a second publication of Aaron Huey: Mitakuye Oyasin.

Through his photographs in this powerful book, Huey portrays the broken social landscape and the ceremonial warrior culture of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. His work goes far beyond the obvious poverty and into the world of the tribe’s visions and dreams. According to Time, “Huey doesn’t consider this book cut-and-dry photojournalism. He didn’t approach every scene with the limitations that bind new photographers and he didn’t shy away from being asked to participate in situations, like a ceremony, that made him part of the spiritual renaissance he was photographing… Now, many call him their brother, uncle, friend.”

First published in the spring of 2013, the first edition sold out by the end of the year. The second edition, published in 2014, will reach a larger audience, and Radius Books will donate 500 copies to public libraries throughout the nation as well as grant the Lannan Foundation 100 copies to be distributed to contacts in our Indigenous Communities Program.

The Robert Irwin Project Challenge Grant - Lannan Foundation

The Robert Irwin Project Challenge Grant

The Robert Irwin Project Challenge Grant
Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX

robert irwin installation chinati

Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas, received support for the construction of a permanent installation by California-based Robert Irwin on the Chinati campus.

Irwin has been developing this project for the past decade for Chinati’s permanent collection. The work will be installed in a former hospital and by shaping light, shadow, and space, will encompass the entire 10,000 square foot building. Roberta Smith of The New York Times explains that Irwin was part of a movement of artists who created “situations that gave the viewer a new awareness of visual perception itself… None of these artists did more with less than Mr. Irwin.” Construction will begin in 2015 with an opening planned in 2016.

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support - Lannan Foundation

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

unm land arts program

The University of New Mexico (UNM) received support for the general operating costs of its Land Arts of the American West program. UNM writes that the program “is an ongoing experiment and interdisciplinary model for creative and critical arts pedagogy based in place.

This program puts students in direct contact with place of the American Southwest through “Field Investigations, Research, Creative Production, and Public Presentation/Dissemination.”  This fall, the place-based program will focus on environmental and social justice issues through the applied research topic of the Watershed. The topic of water will lead the LAAW pedagogical framework, encouraging students to explore the creative process of artist as provocateur while considering historic, social, environmental, and climate change issues in the Southwest region.

Chuck Close Photographs Exhibition and Publication - Lannan Foundation

Chuck Close Photographs Exhibition and Publication

Chuck Close Photographs Exhibition and Publication
Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, NY

chuck close photographs

In 2014, the Parrish Art Museum received a grant for its 2015 exhibition, Chuck Close Photographs, which presents more than 90 images created by Close from 1964 to the present.

This comprehensive survey explores how Chuck Close – perhaps one of the most important figures in contemporary art – has stretched the boundaries of photographic means, methods, and approaches. The exhibition opens at the Parrish in Water Mill, New York and then will tour the United States. A 160-page fully illustrated book published by Prestel accompanies the exhibition. Close uses his work, according to The New York Times, “as a vehicle to explore how photography relates to painting, and how these mediums both represent and affect our view of the world and ourselves.”

View Chuck Close’s bio on Lannan.org.

Andrea Bowers: Memorial to Arcadia Woodlands Clear Cut - Lannan Foundation

Andrea Bowers: Memorial to Arcadia Woodlands Clear Cut

Andrea Bowers: Memorial to Arcadia Woodlands Clear Cut and The United States v. Tim DeChristopher Exhibition
SITE Santa Fe, NM

andrea bowers memorial to arcadia woodlands clear cut

SITE Santa Fe received a grant for its 2014 exhibition of two works by Andrea Bowers, who consciously integrates terminologies, discourses, and tactics from political activism into her work.

In 2011, Bowers and three other activists were arrested for climbing into the trees of an oak woodland habitat in Arcadia, California in an attempt to save a pristine forest of 250 trees from being clear-cut by the County of Los Angeles.  Memorial to Arcadia Woodlands Clear Cut, a sculpture woven from the stumps, logs, and slash that remained after the clear cut, commemorates the lost trees.

Bower’s second project exhibited by SITE Santa Fe, The United States v. Tim DeChristopher, is a single channel video celebrating DeChristopher’s act of civil disobedience when he bid for and won 22,000 acres of land the US Government was auctioning off for oil and gas drilling. The video features interviews with DeChristopher as well as footage of the artist walking the 14 parcels of land near Arches National Park and Labyrinth Canyon.

UNE and KNOUN by Christine Corday Outdoor Sculpture Installation - Lannan Foundation

UNE and KNOUN by Christine Corday Outdoor Sculpture Installation

UNE and KNOUN by Christine Corday Outdoor Sculpture Installation
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA

christine corday outdoor sculpture installation

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) received a grant for its 2014-2015 exhibition of Christine Corday’s massive outdoor sculptures, UNE and KNOUN. Both sculptures are part of Corday’s Protoist Series, a collection of Forms (Corday chooses to capitalize the word when describing her sculptures) made to weather and change with human interaction.

Corday first presented UNE, a three-ton, 16-foot steel arc, in New York City under the High Line in 2008 so that its encounter, in the words of the artist, would be a “a complete unexpected moment.” KNOUN is a two pillar Form with a base and a height of 13 feet that investigates balance and gravity. The project explores the moment in between sensory perception and definition.

View Christine Corday’s bio on Lannan.org.

2014 Art + Environment Conference - Lannan Foundation

2014 Art + Environment Conference

2014 Art + Environment Conference
Nevada Museum of Art, Reno

Art + Environment Conference

The Nevada Museum of Art received a grant to support its 2014 Art + Environment Conference, which occurred on October 9-11, 2014. The conference unites artists, scholars, designers, and writers: people who are makers of art in order to create new knowledge on a global scale and better understand humanity’s role in nature. The discussion focused on the themes of Posthumanism, Geoaesthetics, and Fieldworks. The conference featured the following speakers: Maya Lin, Petah Coyne, Elmgreen & Dragset, and Terry Evans.

Events Ashore by An-My Le Publication - Lannan Foundation

Events Ashore by An-My Le Publication

Events Ashore by An-My Lê Publication
Aperture Foundation, New York, NY

An-My Le with a soldier

In 2014, Aperture Foundation received a grant for the publication of An-My Lê: Events Ashore, a book of photographs by An-My Lê. Inspired by her personal history as a political refugee from Vietnam as well as the geopolitical forces and conflicts that shape the landscapes from humanitarian missions around the world, Lê’s photographic work follows the U.S. Navy and primarily focuses on non-combat roles. Covering strategic trainings and engagements in the U.S., Africa and Asia, the North Arabian Gulf and Indian Ocean, as well as scientific missions in the Arctic and Antarctic, Lê states, “A polarizing subject in popular imagination, the U.S. military has inspired fear, patriotism, debate and suspicion. My goal has been to give a visual analog to that complex topic, to address issues of power and fragility.” The book was published in October 2014.

View An-My Lê‘s bio on Lannan.org.

Thomas Joshua Cooper: Carry Me - Lannan Foundation

Thomas Joshua Cooper: Carry Me

Thomas Joshua Cooper: Carry Me

An exhibition from the Lannan Collection featuring river images by Thomas Joshua Cooper
28 February – 19 April 2015

Last good byes—hidden dangers. Weeping Willows on the Trail of Tears, The East Bank of the lower Mississippi River, Trail of Tears State Park, near Jackson, Cape Girardeau County, Mississippi, U.S.A.
Image: Last good byes—hidden dangers. Weeping Willows on the Trail of Tears, The East Bank of the lower Mississippi River, Trail of Tears State Park, near Jackson, Cape Girardeau County, Mississippi, U.S.A., 2010/2014, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Opening Reception with the Artist Saturday 28 February from 5 to 7pm

Lannan Foundation Announces a Public Exhibition
Contact: Christie Davis (505) 954-5140 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Gallery Hours: Saturdays and Sundays noon to 5pm or by appointment

Lannan Foundation Gallery
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM
Tel. 505.954.5149

Download a catalog of this exhibit. (PDF)

Artist Walk Through: Thomas Joshua Cooper in Carry Me

February 25, 2015
This was a private event, however, there is audio and video of the gallery tour on our podcast site:

Thomas Joshua Cooper, Audio, Artist Walk Through: Carry Me
Thomas Joshua Cooper, Video, Artist Walk Through: Carry Me

View Thomas Joshua Cooper’s bio on Lannan.org.

UPDATE: Please scroll down to view photos of the exhibit installation.

About the Exhibition:

Swing low, sweet chariot
Coming for to carry me home

While primarily known for his photographs of oceans and seas, Thomas Joshua Cooper has also set his sights on rivers across Europe, North America, South America and Africa.  Within his ongoing twenty-five-year-long project, The World’s Edge—The Atlantic Basin Project—An Atlas of Emptiness and Extremity, Cooper has made pictures (the artist is explicit that he makes rather than takes pictures) of major rivers on four continents including the Plate in Argentina, the Mississippi in the U.S., and the Rhine in Germany. Cooper also recently presented an exhibition in the U.K. of Scottish work entitled Scattered Waters: Sources, Streams and Rivers. In the accompanying catalogue he writes, “I have lived near, played by and travelled along these rivers during the 32 years that Scotland has been my home.”

Last Light, Autumn, Along the Pecos River, The Pecos National Wilderness Area, Near Windy Bridge, San Miguel County
Image: Last Light, Autumn, Along the Pecos River, The Pecos National Wilderness Area, Near Windy Bridge, San Miguel County, 2003-2004, Collection Lannan Foundation.

The Lannan exhibition turns its view towards America and includes larger well-known rivers like the Hudson and the Rio Grande as well as smaller, more personal locales to the artist such as the Pecos in New Mexico and the Little Blue in Oklahoma. The exhibition’s title, Carry Me, takes its name from the American spiritual song “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” written by Wallis Willis, a Choctaw freedman in the former Indian Territory of what is now Choctaw County, Oklahoma. Taking the Red River as inspiration, Willis crafted this hymn in reference to the Jordan River and the Biblical passage where the Prophet Elijah is taken to heaven by a chariot. Metaphorically, the song represents the Underground Railroad and the passage of African American slaves from the South to their freedom in the North. This song, with its inspirational river and uniquely American story, is poignant as it reminds us of works by Cooper included in the Carry Me exhibition.

drowning trees –Looking West-towards Exile and the so-called “Indian Nations”, The East Bank or the lower Mississippi River, Trail of Tears State Park, near Jackson, Cape Girardeau County, Mississippi, U.S.A.
Image: drowning trees –Looking West-towards Exile and the so-called “Indian Nations”, The East Bank or the lower Mississippi River, Trail of Tears State Park, near Jackson, Cape Girardeau County, Mississippi, U.S.A. 2010/2014

In his series Drowned Trees Along the Mississippi: From Source to Sea—Continuing Observations on an American History of Place, Cooper includes the phrase “Trail of Tears” in two titles, referring to his father’s Cherokee family members who once lived along the Mississippi and were some of the first Native Americans of the region forced off their land and, as Cooper explains, “made to cross the river,” heading west towards Oklahoma in 1838-1839. A note that accompanies the above work reads:

A start point for the Trail of Tears, and forced removal of the
Cherokee Nation, from their traditional homelands East of the
Mississippi River, to the West and across the Mississippi to
involuntary relocation into “Indian Territory”. This action
was made possible, and legal, by the Act of Congress, the
Indian Removal Act (1830).

Of this Cooper said, “It was a forced removal and relocation; something we now call ethnic cleansing.” This piece connects to an earlier work by Cooper entitled, Remembering My Father’s Tribal Grandparents, On the Little Blue, Southwest of the Unita Homestead, The Cherokee Nation, Maries County, Oklahoma, U.S.A., 2003/2004. He considers the earlier work to be about redemption as, despite their forced relocation, Oklahoma became a good home for his Cherokee family for at least two generations until the Dust Bowl.

The Drowned Trees title for his Mississippi series emerged when Cooper was on site, photographically mapping the river from its source in Minnesota to its finish in Louisiana. He was drawn to what he calls “the bog cotton,” a grass that grows along the river’s edge. His guide used a phrase that struck Cooper immediately, “The dark path is the river.” Cooper noted that trees were growing in the source stream and had died because the water was too deep. He consented that rivers ebb and flow, but that an astounding number of trees along the river’s edge were dead or “drowning.”

In making the Mississippi pictures Cooper wondered, “What does it take to make people deal with the fragility of things?” The trees brought to mind for him the notion of “to discard.” Cooper was listening to American Blues music throughout this voyage and was deeply influenced by the lyrics, making him think, “This river tells me everything I need to know about the state of America.” In all, he hopes the Drowned Trees series will, “Remind people that history is personal. It doesn’t happen to the ‘other,’ it happens to us.”

Shoshone Falls: A Premonitional Work, message to Timothy H. O’Sullivan, Gullfoss (Golden Falls), Iceland
Image: Shoshone Falls: A Premonitional Work, message to Timothy H. O’Sullivan, Gullfoss (Golden Falls), Iceland, 1987, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Thomas Joshua Cooper is a modern day explorer, having traversed the same routes as Columbus, Magellan, and Drake, to name a few. An avid reader of history and exploration, Cooper’s library includes Mountaineering in the Sierra Nevada, published in 1872 by Clarence King, a Yale-educated geologist and mining engineer, who, along with the photographer Timothy H. O’Sullivan, created the first geological survey of a cross-section of the Rocky Mountains, including Shoshone Falls, Idaho, where O’Sullivan made some of his most striking images. In 1987, while working at Gullfoss (Golden Falls) in Iceland, Cooper remembered King’s description of coming upon Shoshone Falls and hearing them before he could see them, “I saw the spray rising before I saw the falls itself, and I understood entirely about his experience…I knew I could make a waterfall picture without the waterfall.” This early image of Gullfoss served as a starting point for a series of Shoshone Falls images Cooper would make some sixteen years later.

The James River and the Thorofare, Black Point, Jamestowne Island, James City County, Virginia, U.S.A.
Image: The James River and the Thorofare, Black Point, Jamestowne Island, James City County, Virginia, U.S.A., 2009/2014 (The site of the first successful English colony in America 1607), Collection Lannan Foundation.

Along with the Mississippi and Shoshone Falls, other rivers such as the York, James, and Potomac make appearances in this exhibition, commemorating early English colonies and the home of George Washington, as well as the site of a victory for the American Revolutionary War General. In the work of Thomas Joshua Cooper we see history through a new lens, revealing both darkness and light in American culture that is carried in its waters.

Sometimes I’m up, and sometimes I’m down,

(Coming for to carry me home)

But still my soul feels heavenly bound.

(Coming for to carry me home)

Christie Davis, Lannan Director of Art & Public Programs

Photos of the Installation at Lannan Foundation

Photo Credit: Addison Doty

Thomas Joshua Cooper Exhibit at Lannan, 2015

Thomas Joshua Cooper Exhibit at Lannan, 2015

Thomas Joshua Cooper Exhibit at Lannan, 2015

Thomas Joshua Cooper Exhibit at Lannan, 2015

Thomas Joshua Cooper Exhibit at Lannan, 2015

Thomas Joshua Cooper Exhibit at Lannan, 2015

Thomas Joshua Cooper Exhibit at Lannan, 2015

DESERT SERENADE: Drones, Fences, Cacti, Test Sites, Craters and Serapes - Lannan Foundation

DESERT SERENADE: Drones, Fences, Cacti, Test Sites, Craters and Serapes

Emi Winter, Spoonbill, 200312 JULY – 31 AUGUST 2014

Opening Reception: Saturday 9 August from 5 to 7pm
Details here.

Lannan Foundation Announces a Public Exhibition
Contact: Christie Mazuera Davis
Lannan Foundation (505) 954-5149
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

An exhibition from the Lannan Collection featuring works by

RENATE ALLER
SUBHANKAR BANERJEE
TOM MILLER
TREVOR PAGLEN
VICTORIA SAMBUNARIS
JAMES TURRELL
EMI WINTER

Image: Emi Winter, Spoonbill, 2003, Oil on Masonite, 90 x 28 inches overall, Collection Lannan Foundation


Lannan Foundation Gallery
Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5pm (weekends only)
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM
Tel. (505) 954-5149

Note: Please click on any of the thumbnail images to view the artwork full size.

UPDATE 28 October 2014: Photos of the installation have been added below. Click here to view.

About the Exhibition:

Desert Serenade presents painting, photography, mixed media and works on paper from the Lannan Collection. The subtitle: Drones, Fences, Cacti, Test Sites, Craters, and Serapes alludes to the subject or to a reference found in the artwork celebrating the beauty of deserts in North America and the often outrageous occurrences found there.

Dead Piñon Where Birds Gather in Autumn: On My Way to the Powerline
Photographer and environmental activist Subhankar Banerjee moved to Northern New Mexico in 2006, not long after completing a massive project in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. Taking walks through the high desert landscape around his new home he was immediately struck with the vast numbers of dead piñon trees, a usually drought hardy slow-growing tree found commonly among juniper trees in the southwestern United States. Sustained years of drought had made the trees vulnerable to infestations by beetles, causing trees that were sometimes hundreds of years old to die.

Image: Subhankar Banerjee, Dead Piñon Where Birds Gather in Autumn: On My Way to the Powerline, 2009, Digital Dye Couple Print, 29 ¾ x 89 ¾ x 1 inch, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Near the dead piñon where birds gather in autumnDuring these walks Banerjee also took note of the cholla cactus in the landscape and was delighted to find this prickly plant often supports a bird’s nest. Of these images Banerjee wrote, “There is always a bird nest in the cholla, unless the cactus has fallen on the ground. What I see in these photographs is the simultaneous juxtaposition of being alive and being dead. From a distance, chollas always look half-dead, but as I get closer, they come alive. In harsh places like the Arctic and the desert, the gap between being alive and being dead seems rather small to me.”

Image: Subhankar Banerjee, Near the dead piñon where birds gather in autumn (I), 2008, Chromogenic print, 36 x 48 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation


Donald Judd, 100 untitled works in mill aluminum, 1982-1986Oaxaca, Mexico born and based painter Emi Winter was a resident at Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas in the early 2000s where she spent a substantial amount of time observing the light on Donald Judd’s aluminum boxes as well as the fluorescent light installations of Dan Flavin.

Image: Donald Judd, 100 untitled works in mill aluminum, 1982-1986, Chinati Foundation

Emi Winter, Untitled, 2004While in Marfa, Winter collaborated with master printer Robert Arber to create a series of prints inspired by the colors in Polaroid photographs she made of the Judd boxes. Winter made the paintings featured in this exhibition using the same techniques she employed while making the prints but this time using oil paint and rollers on panels. Of the near neon glow that emits from the paintings she explained, “I was attracted to the bright center of the lights (Dan Flavin) and the way they spilled color away from the center.”

Image: Emi Winter, Untitled, 2004, Oil on Masonite, 24 x 18 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

Dan Flavin, untitled (Marfa project), 1996
Image: Dan Flavin, untitled (Marfa project), 1996, Chinati Foundation

Emi Winter, Spoonbill, 2003When viewing the large painting Spoonbill, 2003 (named for the tropical bird the artist had seen in Mexico) one cannot help but think of a brightly colored Mexican serape or rug.

In connection with naming the work after birds in Mexico she states, “I’m often thinking of how to represent my experience as a dual citizen with a bicultural experience.” While this series was not specifically inspired by such weavings, the artist has subsequently made this connection. Having collaborated for the last five years with a weaver in a village outside of Oaxaca, Winter plans to present some of her rugs along side her paintings in an upcoming exhibition.

Image: Emi Winter, Spoonbill, 2003, Oil on Masonite, 90 x 28 inches overall (five 18 x 48 inch panels), Collection Lannan Foundation


Victoria Sambunaris, Untitled (Border fence near Naco, AZ), 2010In 2009 American landscape photographer Victoria Sambunaris drove over 1,000 miles along the U.S-Mexico border from Del Rio, Texas to San Diego, California.

Image: Victoria Sambunaris, Untitled (Border fence near Naco, AZ), 2010, Chromogenic print, 39 x 55 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation


Victoria Sambunaris, Untitled (Border view south from grasslands), Hereford, Arizona 2010
Several of the images Sambunaris made along the way feature portions of the daunting fence that lines the border, constructed by the U.S. Government to deter border crossings from our neighbors to the south. “Each location along the way gave insight to a rich history and culturally diverse population,” the artist explains. “Each person I encountered had a captivating story about their life on the border and how they arrived at this place.”

Her images remind us that this vast landscape has existed long before the governments that now control it and that both wildlife and humans have crossed this border regularly until the more recent impositions of physical and legal barriers.

Image: Victoria Sambunaris, Untitled (Border view south from grasslands), Hereford, Arizona 2010, Chromogenic Print, 55 x 76 inches, Courtesy of the Artist


Tom Miller, New Standard (white), 2012The fences and barriers we create in our minds are the subject of the two paintings by Tom Miller included in Desert Serenade.

Image: Tom Miller, New Standard (white), 2012. Acrylic on paper. 30 x 32 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

His use of layers of paint in these architectural paintings creates the effect of sculpture on a flat page. Of the work he has said, “I use forced perspective and symmetry in my work as a structural limitation and as a metaphor or analysis of the political condition.” Using shades of grey, black and white, the artist’s palette choice is meant to refer to notions of truth and specificity. Miller builds up the paint to create a physical barrier on the page describing the resulting image as, “constructed, ominous, precise and physical,” much like the effects of the actual fence pictured in Sambunaris’s photograph.


Trevor Paglen, Reaper Drone (Indian Springs, NV; Distance – 2 miles), 2010Trevor Paglen’s work looks to another manner in which the movements of humans are controlled, or at least scrutinized, by the United States Government through its use of secret drones and satellites with the desert often serving as a backdrop or launching point. The “classified universe,” as Paglen termed it, includes sites in New Mexico like Los Alamos and Jornada del Muerto as well as Las Vegas and Tonopah in Nevada.

Image: Trevor Paglen, Reaper Drone (Indian Springs, NV; Distance – 2 miles), 2010, Chromogenic Print, 30 x 36 inches, Edition 5 of 5, Collection Lannan Foundation

Paglen’s Reaper Drone (Indian Springs, NV; Distance-2 miles), 2010, taken from two miles away, conveys a light aircraft with a sinister weight to it. Many of Paglen’s images in his drone series are of a beautiful sky with a speck that, to some, may appear as a flaw in the photograph. On making these images he said, “If you were driving through Nevada you would sometimes see them. I was thinking about the colonization and transformation of the sky as an aesthetic thing, but also a political thing.”

Trevor Paglen, Artifacts (Anasazi Cliff Dwellings, Canyon de Chelly, Spacecraft In Perpetual Geosynchronous Orbit, 35,786 km Above Equator), 2010
Paglen also turns his lens towards the heavens as seen in a diptych featured in the exhibition titled Artifacts (Anasazi Cliff Dwellings, Canyon de Chelly, Spacecraft in Perpetual Geosynchronous Orbit, 35,786 km Above Equator), 2010.

Image: Trevor Paglen, Artifacts (Anasazi Cliff Dwellings, Canyon de Chelly, Spacecraft In Perpetual Geosynchronous Orbit, 35,786 km Above Equator), 2010, Chromogenic Print, 40 x 50 inches each, Edition 5 of 5, Collection Lannan Foundation

Of the piece Paglen explains, “On the left side of this diptych is an Anasazi cliff dwelling in modern day Arizona. The Anasazi, which is a Navajo word for “ancient ones” or “ancient enemies,” disappeared from the Southwest around 1100 C.E., many hundreds of years before the contemporary tribes moved to the area.

The photograph on the right shows a ring of geostationary and geosynchronous spacecraft hovering over the equator at a distance of 36,000km. At this altitude, atmospheric drag does not affect the spacecraft. That being the case, these spacecraft, many of which are no longer functioning, will remain in orbit in virtual perpetuity.”


Renate Aller, Pascua: Easter Sunday, White Sands, New Mexico; Atlantic Ocean, 2012
Also in New Mexico, in the Jornada del Muerto desert (Spanish for Journey of the Dead Man) where Trevor Paglen has made work, lies White Sands, a combination missile range and National Monument. The location is perhaps most famously referred to in conjunction with Trinity, the code name for the first detonation of a nuclear weapon, occurring there on July 16, 1945. This park, surrounded by military installations, is a World Heritage Site where thousands of people visit annually to take in its majestic white expanse.

Image: Renate Aller, Pascua: Easter Sunday, White Sands, New Mexico; Atlantic Ocean, 2012, Vintage hand bound book in custom box, 42 ½ x 18 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

Renate Aller visited White Sands on Easter Sunday in 2012 and 2013, resulting in a body of work she calls Pascua. Images of families lounging, picnicking and walking all with a dramatic backdrop of pure white sands are punctuated with color as found in beach umbrellas and brightly colored clothing.

Renate Aller, Pascua: Easter Sunday, White Sands, New Mexico; Atlantic Ocean, 2012
The White Sands images are made into diptychs by pairing them on the page with images from Aller’s earlier Oceanscapes-One View 1999 to present, featuring stunning Atlantic Ocean horizon views taken on Long Island at all times of the day and year. The combination can be confusing to the viewer, conveying two views from a beach scene when, in reality, one is the Atlantic Ocean and the other a desert in southern New Mexico. If one is unaware of the history of White Sands, the images portray an ease and innocence, while understanding the place’s role in the history of nuclear warfare and its on-going military weapons testing makes them even more sublime. Aller’s images from this series are presented in a unique vintage handbound book measuring 85 inches wide when opened.

Image: Renate Aller, Pascua: Easter Sunday, White Sands, New Mexico; Atlantic Ocean, 2012, Vintage handbound book in custom box, 42 ½ x 18 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation


James Turrell’s Roden Crater, Courtesy of the ArtistLight and space artist James Turrell said, “My work is more about your seeing than it is about my seeing, although it is a product of my seeing. I’m also interested in the sense of presence of space; that is space where you feel a presence, almost an entity — that physical feeling and power that space can give.”

Image: James Turrell’s Roden Crater, Courtesy of the Artist

Turrell has spent a good portion of his career working on Roden Crater, an extinct volcanic cinder cone situated at 5,400 feet elevation and found in the San Francisco Volcanic Field in Arizona, not far from Flagstaff, the Painted Desert and the Grand Canyon. The artist has been working to transform the crater into a natural eye observatory for the past 40 years from his earliest conception of the project in 1974, to the purchase of the site in 1977, and the subsequent years of construction.

James Turrell, Early Site Plan & Section with White Bowl
Drawing inspiration from ancient celestial viewing sites and ruins around the world Turrell explained, “I admire Borobudur, Angkor Wat, Pagan, Machu Picchu, the Mayan pyramids, the Egyptian pyramids, Herodium, Old Sarum, Newgrange and the Maes Howe. These places and structures have certainly influenced my thinking. These thoughts will find concurrence in Roden Crater.”

Image: James Turrell, Early Site Plan & Section with White Bowl, Mylar, beeswax, emulsion, ink, liquitex, wax pastel, 40 x 58

James Turrell, Shadowed Bowl in Grey, 1992The mixed media pieces presented in the exhibition feature both celestial and terrestrial portraits of Roden Crater. Using a variety of media such as emulsion, mylar, beeswax, ink, liquitex and pastel, the crater is conceived somewhere between a blueprint and an imagined desert landscape.

James Turrell, Shadowed Bowl in Grey, 1992, Mylar, beeswax, emulsion, ink, liquitex, wax pastel, 39 ½ x 40

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Installation View, Desert Serenade
Lannan Foundation, Santa Fe, NM 12 July - 31 August 2014

Installation View, Desert Serenade, Lannan Foundation, L003

Installation View, Desert Serenade, Lannan Foundation, L004

Installation View, Desert Serenade, Lannan Foundation, L005

Installation View, Desert Serenade, Lannan Foundation, L006

Installation View, Desert Serenade, Lannan Foundation, L008

Installation View, Desert Serenade, Lannan Foundation, L010

Installation View, Desert Serenade, Lannan Foundation, L012

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Nancy Holt: Sightlines Paperback Edition Publication - Lannan Foundation

Nancy Holt: Sightlines Paperback Edition Publication

Nancy Holt: Sightlines
Credit: Nancy Holt, Courtesy Haunch of Venison, Concrete Visions, 1967

Nancy Holt: Sightlines Paperback Edition Publication
Providence Productions International, Inc.

In 2010 Lannan made a grant to Providence Productions for the publication of Nancy Holt: Sightlines, the first comprehensive monograph of Holt’s 40 plus year history of making art. As the Graham Foundation noted, “Nancy Holt: Sightlines showcases the artist’s transformation of the perception of the landscape through the use of different observational modes in her early films, videos and related works from 1966 to 1980.” This publication has been extremely well received and has served as the companion publication to the exhibition of the same name as well as many other solo and group shows Holt has been included in over the last few years, both nationally and internationally. Providence Productions has received support for the publication of a paperback edition of Sightlines thus keeping this significant publication available and in circulation.

Julián Cardona: Stardust Memories of the Calle Mariscal Publication - Lannan Foundation

Julián Cardona: Stardust Memories of the Calle Mariscal Publication

Julian Cardona: Stardust Memories of the Calle Mariscal Publication
Credit: Julián Cardona

Julián Cardona: Stardust Memories of the Calle Mariscal Publication
The Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Art, University of Texas at El Paso

The Rubin Center at the University of Texas at El Paso received support for the publication of Julián Cardona: Stardust: Memories of the Calle Mariscal. The book will feature a series of photographs documenting the Calle Mariscal in Ciudad Juárez from 2007 to 2011, just before it was completely razed by the city. One of the most notorious streets in this infamous border town, the buildings were systematically demolished in an effort to curtail the violence and lawlessness it supported. Cardona created this body of work in an effort to prevent the erasure of the public’s memory of this famous street and its role in the history of the U.S.-Mexico border. The publication will feature an essay by writer Willivaldo Delgadillo and includes transcripts of interviews conducted by Cardona on the Calle Mariscal with some of its more colorful inhabitants. As the Rubin Center at the University of Texas at El Paso noted, “Cardona not only documented the Calle Mariscal before its destruction in a series of stunning photographs, but also interviewed people who lived, worked, or visited there.”

View Julián Cardona’s bio on Lannan.org.

Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt Exhibition

Sol Lewitt, Wall Drawing 46
Credit: Sol Lewitt, Wall Drawing 46

Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt Exhibition
The Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin

The Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin received support for its exhibition and publication of Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt, on view from February 23 to May 18, 2014. The exhibition and catalogue celebrate the close friendship of Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt and will feature 35-45 works of art, including sculptures, paintings, drawings, prints and wall drawings. The exhibition will highlight the artists’ decade-long friendship and the influence each artist had on the other, culminating with Wall Drawing #46, the “not straight lines” wall drawing LeWitt created in response to Hesse’s untimely death in 1970. The accompanying catalogue will feature approximately 50 full-plate color images and include a personal recollection by art critic, writer and activist Lucy Lippard, a friend of both artists.

View Sol LeWitt’s bio on Lannan.org.

The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe with Photographs - Lannan Foundation

The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe with Photographs

Don Usner, The Faces of Lannan
Credit: Don Usner, The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe

The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe with Photographs by Don Usner Exhibition
Los Alamos County Library System

The Mesa Public Library, part of the Los Alamos County Library System, is borrowing the Lannan exhibition, The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe, with Photographs by Don Usner, where it is on view from November 8 to December 31, 2013. The library features a state of the art gallery space and has a loyal following for its exhibition program. The library requested support in presenting this exhibition to cover related expenses as well as an honorarium for Don Usner to give a public lecture. In addition to Don Usner being a native of Los Alamos, the exhibition is of significant relevance to the library as its subject matter is poets and writers. This is the same exhibition that was presented at Lannan in the fall of 2012.

View Don Usner’s bio on Lannan.org.

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support - Lannan Foundation

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support

Julie Brown, Rechoose, 2004
Credit: Julie Brown, Rechoose, 2004

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

The Land Arts of the American West program at the University of New Mexico  received a grant in support of general operating costs. Land Arts of the American West is an ongoing experiment in an interdisciplinary model for an Arts pedagogy based in place. The Land Arts program provides students with direct, physical engagement with a full range of human interventions in the landscape, from pre-contact Native American architecture, pictographs and petroglyphs to contemporary earthworks, federal infrastructure, and the constructions of the US Military. Land art includes gestures both grand and small, directing attention from potsherds, cigarette butts, and tracks in the sand to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military/industrial projects such as hydroelectric dams and decommissioned airfields. Each year the Land Arts program travels throughout the southwest and into north central Mexico for more than fifty days to live and work on the land. Currently, they are focusing on the sustainability of the southwest in terms of food production and water usage. Bill Gilbert, director of the program, has worked extensively to secure a five-year grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation in support of the Land Arts Mobile Research Center, a project that will allow them to deepen established relationships with artists and communities by extending the engagement beyond the confines of the Land Arts field program to become the focus for graduate and undergraduate thesis projects.

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Publication - Lannan Foundation

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Publication

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape
Credit: Victoria Sambunaris (American, born 1964). Untitled (Red containers, wet ground), Fort Worth, Texas, 2000. Chromogenic print, edition 3/5, 39 x 55 inches (99.1 x 139.7 cm). Collection Lannan Foundation.

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Publication
Radius Books

Radius Books received a grant in support of the publication of Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape. This comprehensive volume is the artist’s first monograph and features color reproductions of more than a decade of Sambunaris’s work. As Sambunaris comments of her impetus, “My motivation to traverse the American landscape is the attempt to reveal the layers of a place. I resist approaching a landscape strictly as an expanse of scenery but view it as an anomaly with an abundance of information to be discovered.”

Natasha Egan, Director of the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, has written an extensive essay for the book. The publication features a reprint, with permission, of Barry Lopez’s short story entitled, “The Mappist,” a work that has deeply inspired Sambunaris. This publication will act as a complement to the Lannan exhibition of the same title, recently presented at MoCP and currently scheduled to tour to the Nevada Museum of Art, the Kuhn Gallery at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and possibly the Rubin Center at the University of Texas at El Paso.

View Victoria Sambunaris’s bio on Lannan.org.

Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts to Michael Berman - Lannan Foundation

Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts to Michael Berman

Michael Berman, Gila
Credit: Michael Berman, Gila

Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts to Michael Berman

Museum of New Mexico Foundation, Santa Fe, NM

The Museum of New Mexico Foundation was awarded a small grant in support of its annual Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts event in honor of awardee Michael Berman. The grant provides support for the exhibition, awards ceremony, and reception in honor of New Mexican artists nominated by the public and selected by the Governor each year. As New Mexico Arts wrote of Berman’s work, “His landscape photography reflects his strong interest in ecology developed through his early studies, and his images call attention to wild places that are under threat.” Berman both volunteers for and donates artwork to conservation organizations, including the Gila Conservation Coalition.

View Michael Berman’s bio on Lannan.org.

AGAIN: Repetition, Obsession and Meditation - Lannan Foundation

AGAIN: Repetition, Obsession and Meditation

20 April - 16 June 2013

Opening Reception Saturday 20 April 2013 from 5 pm to 7 pm

Lannan Gallery
309 Read Street
Tel. 505-954-5149

Gallery Hours:
Saturdays and Sundays ONLY
Noon to 5pm

Again features artworks where repetition, obsession or meditation, are key elements to the artist’s process, sometimes obvious in the resulting artwork, sometimes not. Whether what compels each is expressed as a life-long obsession with a subject, such as the bird for Jean-Luc Mylayne, or a repetitive action, as seen in prints by Sol LeWitt and Agnes Martin, or a meditative practice that results in an object like Susan York’s hand-polished solid graphite sculptures, the artists in this exhibition repeat themes, motions, motifs and materials again and again, over and over.

A full list of the artist bios and artwork presented in this exhibition can be found on the Exhibition Opening event page here.

You may download the event flyer here.

Exhibition photos are followed by a complete catalog listing the pieces in the exhibition.


AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery
AGAIN: Exhibit photos Lannan Art Gallery


March 2006, 2012 by renate allerRenate Aller
March 2006, 2012
Archival pigment print photograph
28 x 40 inches

December 2008, 2012, by renate allerRenate Aller
December 2008, 2012
Archival pigment print photograph
28 x 40 inches

stanza dell'amore 24, 2006 by stuart arendsStuart Arends
Stanza dell’Amore 24, 2006
Oil and wax on wood
26 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/4 inches

Untitled, from nowhere near (nw 19), 1999 by uta barthUta Barth
untitled, from nowhere near (nw 19), 1999
Color photograph on panel
35 x 164 inches (overall) triptych

Chuck Close, Self Portrait, 1999Chuck Close
Self-Portrait, 1999
Daguerreotype
5 1/2 x 4 1/4 inches

The Lighthouse Series, 1999 by olafur eliassonOlafur Eliasson
The Lighthouse Series, 1999
Color photographs
9 1/2 x 14 1/8 inches each; 60 3/4 x 67 3/4

Koan Box-Red Orange/Yellow Green, 2005-2008  by lawrence fodorLawrence Fodor
Koan Box-Red Orange/Yellow Green, 2005-2008
Oil, wax, alkyd, 22k gold on cigar box
10 1/2 x 8 1/4 x 2 inches

Koan Box-Blue Violet/Yellow Ochre, 2004-2007 by lawrence fodorLawrence Fodor
Koan Box-Blue Violet/Yellow Ochre, 2004-2007
Oil, wax, alkyd, 18k gold on cigar box
10 1/2 x 8 1/4 x 2 inches

Lawrence Fodor
Koan Box-Grey Green/Violet, 2005-2008 by lawrence fodor
Oil, wax, alkyd, 18k gold on cigar box
10 1/2 x 8 1/4 x 2 inches

Lawrence Fodor
Koan Box-Sienna/Yellow, 2005-2007 by lawrence fodor
Oil, wax, alkyd, 22k yellow gold on cigar box
10 1/2 x 8 1/4 x 2 inches

Timelapse: Kitchen, Lincoln St, Marfa, 2008/2010 by martha hughesMartha Hughes
Timelapse: Kitchen, Lincoln St, Marfa, 2008/2010
Acrylic on panel
8 x 10 inches each

Track and Field:  Drawing from the Arena, 2003 by cassandra jonesCassandra C. Jones
Track and Field: Drawing from the Arena, 2003
Chromira print
36 x 102 inches

Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn at random, within a square using four direction by sol lewittSol LeWitt
Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn at randowm, within a square using four direction of line, 1) vertical 2) horizontal 3) diagonal, left to right 4) diagonal, right to left and all combinations of those lines
Etching on paper
28 x 28 inches

Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn at random, within a square using four direction by sol lewittSol LeWitt
Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn at randowm, within a square using four direction of line, 1) vertical 2) horizontal 3) diagonal, left to right 4) diagonal, right to left and all combinations of those lines
Etching on paper
28 x 28 inches

Yellow Lines, 2004 by david marshallDavid Marshall
Yellow Lines, 2004
Fuji crystal archive print photograph
30 x 36 inches

Airport Reflection, 2004 by david marshallDavid Marshall
Airport Reflection, 2004
Fuji crystal archive print photograph
30 x 36 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio by agnes martinAgnes Martin
Untitled, 1991, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam portfolio
Lithographs on velum
12 x 12 inches

Mutation 599, 2011 by pard morrisonPard Morrison
Mutation 599, 2011
Enamel on acrylic
21 1/8 x 17 1/8 inches

Mutation 705, 2011 by pard morrisonPard Morrison
Mutation 705, 2011
Enamel on acrylic
21 1/8 x 17 1/8 inches

Mutation 595, 2011 by pard morrisonPard Morrison
Mutation 595, 2011
Enamel on acrylic
21 1/8 x 17 1/8 inches



utation 703, 2011 by pard morrisonPard Morrison
Mutation 703, 2011
Enamel on acrylic
21 1/8 x 17 1/8 inches

No. B7 novembre- décembre 2000-janvier 2001, 2001 by jean-luc mylayneJean-Luc Mylayne
No. B7 novembre- décembre 2000-janvier 2001, 2001
Chromogenic print
61 1/8 x 49 1/4 inches

No. B7 novembre- décembre 2000-janvier 2001, 2001  by jean-luc mylayneJean-Luc Mylayne
No. B4 novembre-décembre 2000-janvier 2001, 2001
Chromogenic print
62 1/4 x 49 3/8 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Eucalyptus #3, 1997 by jorge pardoJorge Pardo
Eucalyptus #3, 1997
Monoprint
13 1/4 x 9 inches

Portrait of Dorian Gray, 1989 by buzz spectorBuzz Spector
Portrait of Dorian Gray, 1989
Altered book with ink
13 x 16 3/4 inches

Untitled, 2002-03 (fuschia) by roger walkerRoger Walker
Untitled, 2002-03 (fuschia)
Ink on paper
12 3/4 x 12 3/4 inches

Untitled, 2003 (gold) by roger walkerRoger Walker
Untitled, 2003 (gold)
Ink on paper
12 3/4 x 12 3/4 inches

Untitled, 2003 (graphite) by roger walkerRoger Walker
Untitled, 2003 (graphite)
Graphite on paper
12 3/4 x 12 3/4 inches

Untitled, 2003 (silver) by roger walkerRoger Walker
Untitled, 2003 (silver)
Ink on paper
12 3/4 x 12 3/4 inches

Untitled, 2005 by Susan YorkSusan York
Untitled, 2005
Solid graphite with aluminum bracket
4 x 6 1/2 x 1 1/2 inches

Untitled, 2005 by Susan YorkSusan York
Untitled, 2005
Solid graphite with aluminum bracket
9 3/4 x 6 x 1 1/2 inches

Asymmetrical bar, deep, 2007 by susan yorkSusan York
Asymmetrical bar, deep, 2007
Solid graphite, with aluminum, brass, steel mount
215/8 x 31/4 x 85/8 inches

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Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM General Operating Support - Lannan Foundation

Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM General Operating Support

Santa Fe Art Institute, General Operating Support

Image:  Blandine Chavanne, Postcard from Butor to Bryen, 1970.

Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM
General Operating Support

The Santa Fe Art Institute received a grant in support of general operating expenses. General operating funds support SFAI’s broad range of offerings including their artist and writer residency program, exhibitions, lectures, workshops and educational programs for youth and teens. For 2013 SFAI presents Contested Space, a series of exhibitions, events and special programs that will explore the complex contemporary landscape–social, political, physical, and cultural–and the arts, ideas and artists that play a major role in shaping public understanding of the powerful dynamics of those spaces.

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Exhibition Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia - Lannan Foundation

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Exhibition Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape

Image: Victoria Sambunaris, Untitled (Farm with workers, Jacumba, California), 2010, Chromogenic Print, 39 x 55 inches. Collection Lannan Foundation.

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape Exhibition
Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College, Chicago, IL

The Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago received support for the exhibition Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape on view from January 11 to March 31, 2013. For more than a decade, Sambunaris has set out on the highway alone, for months at a time, to photograph the United States, describing her motivation as “an unrelenting curiosity of wanting to understand the American landscape and where we are in it.” During her travels she has spoken with truckers, miners, hunters, ranchers, geologists, park rangers, campers and fellow explorers.

For most of my photographic life, my interest has been the American landscape. I have journeyed extensively in my car throughout this country taking particular interest in the vast transformation of the landscape: the industrial parks of New Jersey; the border towns along the Rio Grande; the Salton Sea in California; the Petrified Forest in Arizona; the industry around Salt Lake, the mines of Nevada, the trains in Nebraska; I have journeyed to Alaska, venturing 500 miles on a gravel road, crossing the Arctic Circle, the Brooks Range to arrive in Prudhoe Bay; I have resided on an abandoned air force base on the salt flats of Utah looking out at the Enola Gay hangar; I have encircled the calderas of Hawaii mesmerized by the vast cavity upon the earth and penetrated the subterranean passages of the landscape to explore the delicate formations that make up our cave systems in the south. I have voyaged the I-80 corridor driving 11,000 miles striving to grasp the force of our geologic evolution and our place within it… –

Victoria Sambunaris

This ten-year survey of Sambunaris’ work features over 30 photographs from the Lannan Collection. Also presented is the artist’s extensive ephemera collection of geographical books, maps, rocks, and mementos from the road, as well as a 30-minute video montage of footage recorded by Sambunaris in the field. The exhibition Taxonomy was curated by Lannan’s Christie Mazuera Davis and Holly E. Hughes, Curator for the Collection at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, where it was first presented in late 2010.

View Victoria Sambunaris’s bio on Lannan.org.

Land Arts of the American West, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM - Lannan Foundation

Land Arts of the American West, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

Land Arts of the American West

Image: The Land Arts program has spent nine years in the field traveling throughout the Great Basin, Colorado Plateau and Chihuahuan Desert camping in remote alpine, high desert, riparian, low desert and human constructed locations. Each year the journeys vary as we explore new sites and engage with new communities. This map is a satellite image of various sites visited during field work in the program.

Land Arts of the American West
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

The Land Arts of the American West program at the University of New Mexico received a grant in support of general operating costs. Land Arts of the American West is an ongoing experiment in an interdisciplinary model for an Arts pedagogy based in place. The Land Arts program provides students with direct, physical engagement with a full range of human interventions in the landscape, from pre contact Native America architecture, pictographs and petrogylphs to contemporary Earthworks, federal infrastructure, and the constructions of the US Military. Land art includes gestures both grand and small, directing attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military/industrial projects such as hydroelectric dams and decommissioned airfields.

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibition Tour Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia Coll - Lannan Foundation

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibition Tour Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia Coll

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibition Tour

Image: Guy Tillim, City Hall, Lumumbashi, DR Congo, 2007. Archival pigment ink print on cotton rag paper. 36 x 52 inches. AP 1 of 2. Collection Lannan Foundation.

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibition Tour
Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College, Chicago, IL

The Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP)  received a grant in support of touring the exhibition Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba to the Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis and to the Rubin Center at the University of Texas at El Paso. This series documents the architecture of colonial and post-colonial Africa, looking at the many city streets named after Patrice Lumumba, one of the first elected African leaders of modern times. Lumumba became the first Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1960 after he helped his country gain independence from Belgium.

Tillim embarked on this project as the recipient of the first Robert Gardner Fellowship in Photography granted by the Peabody Museum at Harvard University. Through quiet photographs of decaying skyscrapers, empty streets, and watching people, Tillim addresses the lost idealism of the region with an approach that is both artistic and journalistic. Tillim comments, “Photojournalism tends to try and create drama. Tries to look for a false drama, tries to use, you know, photojournalistic iconography to create a sense of moment. I think that there is a movement away from that in photojournalism…because what you used to have were these quite inarticulate images that were seen to be so full of drama.”

This exhibition has toured widely in Europe in cities such as Rome, Paris, and Amsterdam and will tour in Canada and the United States through 2013.

View Guy Tillim’s bio on Lannan.org.

Michael P. Berman’s The Gila: Radical Visions/The Enduring Silence publication Gila Resources Inform - Lannan Foundation

Michael P. Berman’s The Gila: Radical Visions/The Enduring Silence publication Gila Resources Inform

Michael P. Berman's The Gila - The Enduring Silence

Image: Michael P. Berman, Agave and Granite, Gila Mountains, Arizona, 2003, Gelatin silver print.

Michael P. Berman’s The Gila: Radical Visions/The Enduring Silence publication
Gila Resources Information Project, Silver City, NM

The Gila Resources Information Project (GRIP) received a grant in support of the publication of Michael P. Berman’s book The Gila: Radical Visions/The Enduring Silence. This book, composed of a number of essays by different writers, showcases the diversity of beliefs and experiences surrounding the Gila Wilderness. The essays are accompanied by a collection of images of the Gila, taken by award-winning artist and Guggenheim Fellow, Michael P. Berman. His black and white photographs of the striking landscape offer a wordless exploration into this complex and subtle setting. To take his photographs, Berman wanders the border wild lands of the U.S. and Mexico, focusing his lens on the local issues–mining, grazing, wilderness, timber, water, growth and the border—that impact the land. He brings an awareness of the complexity of the biological world and the political and social dialogue of the West to his art, which he then uses as a catalyst to renew and heighten our perception of the land. In describing his work, Berman comments, “Art can serve as a kind of incubator for nascent truths as they evolve a coherent meaning. Art can also elicit and galvanize the support of a larger community for complex ideas.”

View Michael P. Berman’s bio on Lannan.org.

Thomas Joshua Cooper: Shoshone Falls Exhibition Sun Valley Center for the Arts, ID - Lannan Foundation

Thomas Joshua Cooper: Shoshone Falls Exhibition Sun Valley Center for the Arts, ID

Thomas Joshua Cooper: Shoshone Falls Exhibition

Credit: Thomas Joshua Cooper, High Noon Shoshone Falls From The Floor of The Snake River Basin, The Jerome and Twin Falls County Borderline, Idaho, USA, 2003, 18 x 22 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation.

Thomas Joshua Cooper: Shoshone Falls Exhibition
Sun Valley Center for the Arts, ID

The Sun Valley Center for the Arts received a grant in support of the presentation of Thomas Joshua Cooper’s Shoshone Falls photographs, in conjunction with the exhibition Shoshone Falls: 3 Perspectives, on view from April 20, through July 7, 2012. One of three artists featured in the exhibition, Cooper’s photographs respond to the work of Timothy O’Sullivan, a photographer on the nineteenth-century geographic surveys led by Clarence King and Lieutenant George M. Wheeler, while simultaneously expanding the artist’s own formal vocabulary in a project that creates a dialogue about history, geography, and the process of photographic image making. Cooper took the photographs in the summer of 2003, when he traveled to Shoshone Falls in southern Idaho to photograph where the Snake River tumbles across a 212 foot precipice, once one of the most sublime and inspiring landscapes in the American West. In reference to his work, Cooper comments, “I see my photographs as meditations, it is as simple as that. To be understood they must be experienced–felt, seen, known. Consequently, I often use the medium of the landscape, for everyone, in some small way, has some very personal relation to the land––thus they are ready (and willing) to come in to look, if not into, at least at the landscapes I produce.”

View Thomas Joshua Cooper’s bio on Lannan.org.

Inigo Manglano-Ovalle’s Phantom Truck in the exhibition MO/RE/AL (More Real?) SITE Santa Fe, NM - Lannan Foundation

Inigo Manglano-Ovalle’s Phantom Truck in the exhibition MO/RE/AL (More Real?) SITE Santa Fe, NM

Manglano-Ovalle's Phantom Truck

Image: Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle, Phantom Truck, 2007.

Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle’s Phantom Truck in the exhibition MO/RE/AL (More Real?)
SITE Santa Fe, NM

Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle’s Phantom Truck, within the exhibition MO/RE/AL (More Real?). Phantom Truck is a full-scale reproduction of a mobile truck trailer, ostensibly containing a biological weapons lab. The piece is inspired by former Secretary of State Colin Powell’s description of such a truck, which he used as justification for the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Manglano-Ovalle, a former MacArthur Fellow, constructed the truck by combining renderings used by Colin Powell and photographs of actual trucks found in Iraq after the invasion. More Real? Art in the Age of Truthiness is presented by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and SITE Santa Fe and premiered in Santa Fe on July 8, 2012. It will then be presented in Minneapolis in 2013.

Steve McQueen: A Survey Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Steve McQueen: A Survey Exhibition

Steve McQueen, Charlotte, 2004

Image: Steve McQueen, Still from Charlotte, 2004.

Steve McQueen: A Survey Exhibition
The Art Institute of Chicago, IL

The Art Institute of Chicago received a grant in support of the exhibition Steve McQueen: A Survey, the first American museum survey of the artist’s work and the first major show by an artist of color at AIC since 1991. McQueen, a British artist of Grenadian descent, creates poetic and metaphorical studies of the contemporary African psyche. His subjects range from the historical genocide of the Caribbean to contemporary gun violence in Great Britain, always casting an unflinching eye on the issue at hand. The artist works in films and moving-image installations, producing work that is both simple and intense. McQueen has been honored with numerous awards, including the Tate’s Turner Prize (1999); the Order of the British Empire (2002); and the Caméra d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival (2008).  He was also made an “official war artist” by the Imperial War Museum, London, and subsequently created a series of “postage stamps,” each featuring a British soldier killed in Iraq. The Art Institute of Chicago holds the largest collection of McQueen’s work in the United States. The exhibition was presented at AIC from October 21, 2012 to January 6, 2013, when it traveled to the Schaulager exhibition space in Basel, Switzerland.

Residence Program, Wendover, UT: Center for Land Use Interpretation, Culver City, CA - Lannan Foundation

Residence Program, Wendover, UT: Center for Land Use Interpretation, Culver City, CA

Center for Land Use Interpretation, Residency Program

Image: Center for Land Use Interpretation’s Artist Residency Program, Wendover, Utah

Residence Program, Wendover, UT
Center for Land Use Interpretation, Culver City, CA

The Center for Land Use Interpretation received a grant in support of CLUI’s Wendover Residence Program. The program enables artists to reside, create, and present work in one of the most dramatic settings in the country: the terminal flats of the Salt Lake Desert. Through an extended stay at the Center’s Residency Program, artists gain a better understanding of the beautiful landscape around them, and in turn, interpret that landscape through their own work. CLUI encourages residents to produce an original piece or documentation (photography, text, sketches, sculptures, film, etc.) of their residency experience for display at the Center’s Wendover exhibit hall. Since the program’s inception in 1997, over 100 artists have been hosted, including Victoria Sambunaris.

The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe - Lannan Foundation

The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe

The Faces of Lannan: Celebrating 15 Years of Lannan Events in Santa Fe
Photographs by Don Usner

29 September - 11 November 2012

Artist Reception Saturday 29 September from 5 pm to 7 pm

Lannan Gallery
309 Read Street
Tel. 505-954-5149

Gallery Hours:
Saturdays and Sundays ONLY
Noon to 5pm

Celebrated native New Mexican photographer Don Usner has been making portraits of Lannan Foundation guest speakers since 1997. Usner has photographed hundreds of unique characters, capturing on film the personalities of famous writers, poets, Nobel Laureates and social activists. From Toni Morrison to Gore Vidal, Lawrence Ferlinghetti to Amy Goodman, and Susan Sontag to Robert Creeley and Cornel West, Usner’s subjects include many of the 20th Century’s most distinguished thinkers.

Don Usner (www.donusner.com) was born in Embudo, near Taos, New Mexico in 1957 and spent his youth in Los Alamos and Chimayó. His family has a long history in the Rio Grande Valley, and its landscape and history have been a significant inspiration in his photography. Usner’s work has been presented in several exhibitions and publications, including Sabino’s Map: Life in Chimayó’s Old Plaza and, with William deBuys, Valles Caldera: A Vision for New Mexico’s National Preserve, as well as a collection of folk tales told by his grandmother, Benigna’s Chimayó, Cuentos from the Old Plaza. Usner has served as Lannan Foundation’s official photographer since 1997.

View Don Usner’s full bio on Lannan.org.

faces of lannan by don usner, collage

General Operating Support - Santa Fe Art Institute - Lannan Foundation

General Operating Support - Santa Fe Art Institute

photo of facilities at santa fe art institute

Photo credit: Facilities, Santa Fe Art Institute

General Operating Support
Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM

The Santa Fe Art Institute received a grant in support of general operating expenses to carry out its exhibition, residency, lecture, education and community program for youth and teens. The Institute functions as an independent, educational, nonprofit organization, offering a robust schedule of events throughout the year. SFAI has featured world-class artists such as Rackstraw Downes, James Drake, Susan York, Tom Joyce, Laurie Anderson, John Baldessari, and Victoria Sambunaris, through the Artists Lecture and Workshop Series.

SFAI also collaborates with institutions and organizations such as the Palace of the Governors, Museum of International Folk Art, and SITE Santa Fe to provide opportunities to engage the arts from a variety of perspectives.

James Drake: Salon of a Thousand Souls Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

James Drake: Salon of a Thousand Souls Exhibition

james drake salon of a thousand souls

Photo credit: Arthur Roger Gallery

James Drake: Salon of a Thousand Souls Exhibition
Museum of New Mexico for the New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM

The New Mexico Museum of Art received a grant in support of its exhibition, James Drake: Salon of a Thousand Souls, on view from October 28, 2011 to April 22, 2012. Throughout his 35-year career, James Drake has studied the theme of humanity in all its triumphs, failures, and follies—including war and resistance, desire and sexuality, connection and alienation, greed and gluttony, and vanity.

The exhibition featured both steel sculptures and large-scale charcoal or pastel drawings by the Santa-Fe artist, including several never-before-exhibited pieces. Works in the exhibition are inspired by both past and more recent historical happenings such as the Mexican Revolution, the Spanish resistance during French occupation, realities of life on the U.S.-Mexico border, or the deaths of 18 illegal immigrants. A fully illustrated publication accompanied the exhibition.

View James Drake’s bio on Lannan.org.

Agitated Histories Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Agitated Histories Exhibition

agitated histories exhibition site santa fe

Photo Credit: Art in America

Agitated Histories Exhibition
SITE Santa Fe, Santa Fe, NM

SITE Santa Fe received a grant in support of Mark Tribe’s large-scale work entitled The Port Huron Project, within the group exhibition Agitated Histories. Agitated Histories was on view at SITE Santa Fe from September 2011 to January 2012. Included in the exhibition was The Port Huron Project, composed of videos of reenactments of protest speeches from the New Left movements of the Vietnam era.

Tribe organized each speech to be delivered by an actor or performance artist to an audience of invited guests and passers-by at the site of the original event. Decades removed from their original context, speeches such as Stokely Carmichael’s “Let Another World be Born,” (1967/2008); Angela Davis’ “The Liberation of Our People,” (1969/2008); and César Chávez’s “We Are also Responsible,” (1971/2008) provide an international and intergenerational perspective on history and the nature of protest.

Dan Flavin: Drawing Exhibition Catalogue - Lannan Foundation

Dan Flavin: Drawing Exhibition Catalogue

dan flavin drawing exhibition

Dan Flavin’s Sketch for “In Honor of Harold Joachim” (Courtesy Morgan Library)

Dan Flavin: Drawing Exhibition Catalogue
The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, NY

The Morgan Library & Museum was awarded a grant in support of the catalogue for its exhibition, Dan Flavin: Drawings, on view from February 17, 2012 to July 1, 2012. This represents the first major exhibition with a scholarly catalogue to explore the important role that drawing played in Flavin’s career. Although the artist is best known for his fluorescent light installations, Flavin (1933-1996) was also an avid draftsman.

The artist produced numerous sketches to plan his light installations and regularly drew portraits and landscapes from life, all of which were included in the exhibition. Also shown was Flavin’s personal collection of drawings, including nineteenth-century American landscapes by Hudson River School artists, Japanese drawings, and twentieth-century works by some of Flavin’s contemporaries and friends. The accompanying catalogue is a 224-page book with 150 illustrations and three essays. The exhibition was produced with full cooperation of Stephen Flavin, the artist’s son and principal lender. Dia Foundation also lent drawings from the artist’s collection.

View Dan Flavin’s bio on Lannan.org.

Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective Exhibition

photo of jay defeo working on the rose

Photograph of Jay DeFeo working on The Rose by Jerry Burchard

Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective Exhibition
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

The Whitney Museum of American Art received a grant in support of its exhibition, Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective, scheduled to open in February 2013. The retrospective will include four decades of the artist’s work, including her monumental landmark painting The Rose (1958-66), which weighs over a ton.

DeFeo (1929-1989) pushed boundaries in her experimentations with media and form, her pieces falling somewhere between representation and abstraction. This retrospective will provide a full summary of her career, and will be accompanied by a full-color monograph featuring between 250 and 300 illustrations. The retrospective will tour domestically and is scheduled to appear at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art from November 3, 2012 through February 3, 2013.

Sharon Core: Early American Publication - Lannan Foundation

Sharon Core: Early American Publication

Sharon Core Early American Publication Radius Books

Sharon Core: Early American Publication
Radius Books, Santa Fe, NM

Radius Books received a grant in support of the publication Sharon Core: Early American. Originally trained as a painter, Core has maintained a fascination with the dichotomy between painterly illusionism and photographic reality. Core’s Early American series is based on early 19th century still life painting, with a particular focus on the work of Raphaelle Peale. In order to create exact photographic renderings of Peale’s paintings, Core collected genuine period tableware and grew the fruit and flowers in her own greenhouse.

In regards to this meticulous process, Core commented, “it’s really a means to an end — to create an illusive representation of another time. The photographs are completely traditional, involving no digital media whatsoever, so I am staging the ‘reality’ of an early-19th-century painting in terms of lighting, subject matter and scale…I go to great pains to come at the image from another direction — to mirror it, so to speak.” The Lannan Foundation has four photographs from the Early American series in its collection. This publication will represent the artist’s first ever monograph.

View Sharon Core’s bio on Lannan.org.

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support - Lannan Foundation

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support

Land Arts of the American Arts 2011

Land Arts of the American West, General Operating Support
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

The Land Arts of the American West program at the University of New Mexico received a grant in support of general operating costs. Land Arts of the American West is a transdisciplinary field program that aims to investigate the evolution of the American southwest. Participants move and camp throughout the southwest for two months in the fall, exploring the geology, weather, architecture, archeology, federal infrastructure, artwork, and human experience of contemporary landscapes.

Sites visited include Chaco Canyon, Roden Crater, the north rim of the Grand Canyon, Michael Heizer’s Double Negative, Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels, Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, the Wendover Complex of the Center for Land Use Interpretation, Bingham Canyon Mine, Lake Powell, Jackpile Mine at Laguna Pueblo, Chiricahua Mountains, Cabinetlandia, Marfa, the Very Large Array and Walter De Maria’s The Lightning Field. The Land Arts program was founded by Bill Gilbert in 2000 with a grant from the Lannan Foundation.

Light Years: Conceptual Art and the Photograph, 1964-1977 - Lannan Foundation

Light Years: Conceptual Art and the Photograph, 1964-1977

John Baldessari Three Balls in the Air

John Baldessari. Throwing Three Balls in the Air to Get a Straight Line (Best of Thirty-Six Attempts), 1973. Detail (1 of 12) from the artist’s book, edition of 2000. Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College Chicago. Photo credit: Art Institute of Chicago

Light Years: Conceptual Art and the Photograph, 1964-1977 Exhibition Catalogue
Art Institute of Chicago, IL

The Art Institute of Chicago received a grant in support of the catalogue for the exhibition Light Years: Conceptual Art and the Photograph, 1964-1977, the very first museum exhibition to examine the path-breaking role photography played in the 1960’s and 1970’s. The exhibit, on view from December 13, 2011 through March 11, 2012, featured more than 140 works by 57 artists, including rarely exhibited pieces by artists from Eastern Europe and by such major artists as Mel Bochner, Tony Conrad, Michael Heizer, Gordon Matta-Clark, and Emilio Prini. The exhibit aimed to illustrate the way in which the pioneering Conceptual Art movement succeeded in bringing photography into the mainstream of contemporary art.

Artists such as Ed Ruscha, Bruce Nauman, John Baldessari, Eleanor Antin, and Sigmar Polke took up the production of new photographs and placed photography firmly on an equal basis with avant-garde painting and sculpture. An extensive catalogue accompanied the exhibition, with a lead essay by Matthew S. Witkovsky, curator and chair of photography at the Art Institute, in addition to contributions from six other scholars.

Ed Ruscha: On the Road Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Ed Ruscha: On the Road Exhibition

ed ruscha on the road exhibition hammer museum

Ed Ruscha: On the Road Exhibition
Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA

The Hammer Museum received a grant in support of its exhibition, Ed Ruscha: On the Road, on view from June 4 to October 28, 2011. This exhibition brought together two great visionaries of art and language: artist Ed Ruscha and Beat novelist Jack Kerouac. Both men revolutionized the use of language to illustrate and comment upon the shifting character of the American cultural landscape.

In 1951, Kerouac wrote On the Road in a mere 20 days, feverishly recording his travels through 1940’s Mexico and the United States. More than 50 years later, Ruscha found inspiration in Kerouac’s words for a series of paintings and drawings that incorporate the text of the radical novel. As Douglas Fogle suggests, “It is completely fitting that Ed Ruscha would take up the challenge of looking at Kerouac’s On the Road. In many ways Ruscha’s entire career has offered an artistic corollary to Kerouac’s linguistic portrait of the American landscape, giving concrete visual form to the poetry of our vernacular roadside.”

The exhibition was also on view at the Denver Art Museum through April 22, 2012.

Transparent: Peter Alexander. Subhankar Banerjee. Uta Barth. Thomas Joshua Cooper. et al - Lannan Foundation

Transparent: Peter Alexander. Subhankar Banerjee. Uta Barth. Thomas Joshua Cooper. et al

Transparent: Peter Alexander. Subhankar Banerjee. Uta Barth. Thomas Joshua Cooper. Gloria Graham. Morris Louis. Robert Moskowitz. Fred Sandback. Kate Shepherd. Iain Stewart. James Turrell.

Opening Reception: Saturday 28 April 2012, 5:00 - 7:00 pm

Lannan Foundation Gallery
28 April – 15 July 2012
Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5pm (weekends only)
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM
Tel. 505-954-5149

Transparent presents painting, photography, sculpture and works on paper spanning over fifty years from the Lannan Collection. Each artwork embodies an aspect of the word transparent, from transmitting light so that what lies beyond is seen clearly, or being fine or sheer enough to be seen through, to work that is free from pretense or deceit, or that seems to allow the passage of X-ray or ultraviolet light.

The various forms transparency takes are exemplified throughout the exhibition as in Morris Louis’s Veil series painting from 1954, in which thin layers of paint are applied to create a veil-like surface. In Peter Alexander’s 1968 untitled resin sculpture, light passes through the wedged tower, creating a similarly hued smoky shadow beyond. In Subhankar Banerjee’s Sky: Often I Look Up and Wish for Rain, 2009, one barely sees through clouds while in the photographs of Thomas Joshua Cooper and Iain Stewart it is fog that provides the filter. Conversely, the geometry of a form becomes clear in the sculptural relief work of Fred Sandback and the empty box paintings of Kate Shepherd. Robert Moskowitz’s grand 1972 painting Yellow Circle evokes a see-through layering of space similar to collage while James Turrell’s aquatints from his Deep Sky series radiate X-ray-like light from an undetectable source. The textures of Salt/Granite/Nickel by Gloria Graham are conveyed through layers of paper while the sparse photographs of Uta Barth capture light through domestic scenes of windows and draperies.

The work assembled for the exhibition Transparent is an homage to the practice of operating in such a way that it is easy for others to see what actions are performed, implying openness, communication, and accountability.

This is a Lannan Art Event.

View Peter Alexander’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Subhankar Banerjee’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Uta Barth’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Thomas Joshua Cooper’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Gloria Graham’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Morris Louis’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Robert Moskowitz’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Fred Sandback’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Kate Shepherd’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Iain Stewart’s bio on Lannan.org.
View James Turrell’s bio on Lannan.org.

image of peter alexander's untitled, 1966-1968
Peter Alexander, Untitled, 1966-1968, Cast polyester resin, 69 ¼ x 6 ½ x 6 ½ inches, Collection Lannan Foundation


image of subhankar banerjee
Subhankar Banerjee, Sky; Often I Look Up and Wish for Rain, 2009, Digital dye coupler print with face-mounted Plexiglas, 30 x 40 inches, Collection of the Artist

image of uta barth's ground #78, 1997
Uta Barth, Ground #78, 1997, Color photograph on panel, 41 x 39 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of uta barth untitled 1998 diptych left
Uta Barth, Untitled (98.8), 1998, (left side of diptych), Color photograph on panel, 30 x 38 inches each, Edition 4 of 6, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of uta barth untitled diptych right
Uta Barth, Untitled (98.8), 1998, (right side of diptych), Color photograph on panel, 30 x 38 inches each, Edition 4 of 6, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of thomas joshua cooper sea fog River guadalquivir
Thomas Joshua Cooper, Sea Fog – Looking West, The Mouth of the River Guadalquivir – The Mid North Atlantic Ocean, San Lucer de Barrameda, Spain, 2003/2004, Selenium and gold chloride toned silver gelatin print, 40 x 54 inches, Edition 1 of 3, Collection Lannan Foundation

image thomas joshua cooper soaking wet snowfall
Thomas Joshua Cooper, Soaking Wet Snowfall , The South Atlantic Ocean and Mar Argentino - The Argentinian Sea, Cabo Espiritu Santo, Isla Grande Tierra del Fuego ,On the border between Chile and Argentina, 2006, The Northeast-most point of the Island, Selenium and gold chloride toned silver gelatin print, 40 x 54 inches, Edition 1 of 3, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of gloria graham salt garnet nickel graphite vellum

Gloria Graham, Salt/Garnet/Nickel, Graphite on 3 sheets of vellum, 33 ¾ x 35 ¾ inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of morris louis untitled 1954 acrylic
Morris Louis, Untitled, 1954, Acrylic on canvas, 95 5/8 x 77 5/8 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

image robert moskowitz yellow circle 1972
Robert Moskowitz, Yellow Circle, 1972, Acrylic on canvas, 90 1/8 x 75 1/8 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of red sandback untitled sculptural study black wall
Fred Sandback, Untitled (Sculptural Study, Black Wall Relief), 2003/2006, Acrylic on wood, 36 x 68 ¼ inches, Edition 1 of 8, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of fred sandback untitled sculptural -study white wall
Fred Sandback, Untitled (Sculptural Study, White Wall Relief), 2003/2006, Acrylic on wood, 36 x 68 ¼ inches, Edition 1 of 8, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of fred sandback untitled sculptural study terra cotta wall
Fred Sandback, Untitled (Sculptural Study, Terra-cotta Wall Relief), 2003/2006, Acrylic on wood, 36 x 68 ¼ inches, Edition 1 of 8, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of kate shepherd whites standing open box blue line
Kate Shepherd, Whites, Standing Open Box, Blue Line, 1999, Oil on wood panel, 44 ¾ x 36 ½ inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of kate shepherd sole line top browns
Kate Shepherd, Sole Line on Top, Thin Standing Box, Browns, 1999, Oil on wood panels, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of iain stewart rythum i - ii - iii
Iain Stewart, Rythum I, II, III, Chromogenic prints, 20 x 16 inches each, Collection Lannan Foundation


image of james turrell deep sky -portfolio 1987 1
James Turrell, Deep Sky Portfolio, 1987, Aquatint on paper, 22 x 30 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation

image of james turrell deep sky portfolio 1987 2
James Turrell, Deep Sky Portfolio, 1987, Aquatint on paper, 22 x 30 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation


Images from the Exhibition. Photography by Addison Doty.

Transparent Exhibit Photos at Lannan Foundation
Transparent Exhibit Photos at Lannan Foundation
Transparent Exhibit Photos at Lannan Foundation
Transparent Exhibit Photos at Lannan Foundation
Transparent Exhibit Photos at Lannan Foundation

Kate Shepherd - Lannan Foundation

Kate Shepherd

Kate Shepherd
1999

View Kate Shepherd’s bio on Lannan.org.

from Kate Shepherd, 1999

from Kate Shepherd, 1999

Morris Louis: Veil Paintings, 1954 - Lannan Foundation

Morris Louis: Veil Paintings, 1954

J. Patrick Lannan, Sr., founder of Lannan Foundation, was introduced to the work of Morris Louis by art critic Clement Greenberg in 1958 and immediately purchased two paintings. He went on to acquire six additional pieces that he later gifted to Lannan Foundation.

View Morris Louis’s bio on Lannan.org.

Untitled (Morris Louis, 1954)
Morris Louis
Magna acrylic paint on canvas
95 5/8 x 77 5/8 inches
Photo Credit: Daniel Barsotti

Untitled (Morris Louis, 1954)
Morris Louis
Magna acrylic paint on canvas
96 x 72 inches red black lav
Photo Credit: Daniel Barsotti

Untitled (Morris Louis, 1954)
Morris Louis
Magna acrylic paint on canvas
103 7/8 x 77 1/8 inches tan back vertical pastels
Photo Credit: Daniel Barsotti

Untitled (Morris Louis, 1954)
Morris Louis
Magna acrylic paint on canvas
77 7/8 x 103 7/8 inches
Collection: Lannan Foundation
Photo Credit: Daniel Barsotti

Installation Photographs

Veil Paintings (Morris Louis, 1954)
Morris Louis
Veil Paintings, 1954
Photo Credit: Daniel Barsotti

Veil Paintings (Morris Louis, 1954)
Morris Louis
Veil Paintings, 1954
Photo Credit: Daniel Barsotti

 

Nancy Holt: Sightlines Publication - Lannan Foundation

Nancy Holt: Sightlines Publication

photo of Nancy Holt filming Sun Tunnels
Image: Nancy Holt shooting the film Sun Tunnels (1978), 1976.

Photo by Lee Deffebach.

Providence Productions International, Inc., Brooklyn, New York, 2010

Providence Productions International, a non-profit founded in 1978 to support the work of experimental art in all disciplines, received a grant in support of the publication Nancy Holt: Sightlines. This is the first monograph on the important postwar artist Nancy Holt (b. 1938), whose far-reaching body of work from the late 1960s to the present includes land art, films, videos, installations and major sculpture commissions. Edited by curator Alena Williams, the book includes essays by Lucy Lippard, Matthew Coolidge, Pamela M. Lee, Julie Alderson, and James Meyer.

The 256-page, full color catalogue is co-published with the University of California Press and was presented in conjunction with the opening of the first international touring exhibition of Nancy Holt, organized by Columbia University for the fall of 2010.

Land Arts of the American West course - Lannan Foundation

Land Arts of the American West course

photo of sunny measuring the milky way

Image: Sunny measuring the Milky Way at Point Sublime, north rim of the Grand Canyon, AZ, 2010.
Photo Link.

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2010
General Operating Support

The Land Arts of the American West program at the University of New Mexico received a grant in support of general operating costs. Land Arts of the American West is an ongoing experiment in an interdisciplinary model for an arts pedagogy based in place. The Land Arts program provides students with direct, physical engagement with a full range of human interventions in the landscape, from pre contact Native America architecture, pictographs and petrogylphs to contemporary Earthworks, federal infrastructure, and the constructions of the US Military. Land art includes gestures both grand and small, directing attention from potshard, cigarette butt, and track in the sand to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military/industrial projects such as hydroelectric dams and decommissioned airfields.

Each year the Land Arts program travels extensively throughout the southwestern United States and north central Mexico to live and work for over fifty days on the land. Time is divided between investigating cultural sites http://landarts.unm.edu/sites.html such as Chaco Canyon, Roden Crater http://www.rodencrater.com/ , Hoover Dam, Wendover Complex of the Center for Land Use Interpretation, Juan Mata Ortiz, Spiral Jetty, and, for the first time this year, Michael Heizer’s City Complex, and working in the variety of eco-niches provided by campsites at places such as the Grand Canyon, Grand Gulch, Gila Wilderness, Bosque del Apache, and Otero Mesa Grasslands.

The current focus is on the issues of sustainability with a particular interest in food production and water use in the southwest. Building on ten years of experience in field programming at Acoma Pueblo and Juan Mata Ortiz, Mexico, Bill Gilbert started the Land Arts program in 2000 with a grant from Lannan Foundation.

Vija Celmins: Television and Disaster, 1964-1966 Exhibition and Catalogue - Lannan Foundation

Vija Celmins: Television and Disaster, 1964-1966 Exhibition and Catalogue

photo of Burning Man, 1966 by Vija Celmins

Image: Vija Celmins, Burning Man, 1966. Oil on canvas. 20 x 22.5 inches. Private Collection, New York.

Photo Link.

The Menil Collection received a grant in support of the exhibition Vija Celmins: Television and Disaster, 1964-1966, on view from November 18, 2010 to February 20, 2011. Co-organized with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the exhibition was the first to concentrate on an important segment of Celmins’ art dictated by a specific time period and subject matter.

The work in this exhibition concentrated on images of war and the power (or lack thereof) of mediated representations. The exhibition, which included fifteen paintings and two sculptures, was accompanied by a 64-page hardcover catalogue featuring original essays. After its presentation in Houston, the exhibition traveled to LACMA, where it was showcased from March 13 to June 5, 2011.

2010
The Menil Collection
Houston, Texas

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibition and Tour - Lannan Foundation

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibition and Tour

photo - Court Records by Guy TillimImage: Guy Tillim, Court records, Lubumbashi, DR Congo, 2007. Archival pigment ink on cotton rag paper. 91.5 x 131.5 cm.
Photo Link.

Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College, Chicago, Illinois, 2010

The Museum of Contemporary Photography received a grant in support of presenting and touring the exhibition Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba, on view in Chicago from January 10 to March 7, 2011. This series records the architecture of colonial and post-colonial Africa, looking at the many city streets named after Patrice Lumumba, one of the first elected African leaders of modern times. Lumumba became the first Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1960 after he helped his country gain independence from Belgium.

In many African cities, there are streets, avenues and squares named after Patrice Lumumba. His speech at the independence celebrations in Lopoldville, in the presence of the Belgian King, Baudouin, unequivocally signaled his opposition to the West’s idea of neo-colonial order that would replace overt domination with indirect control. He was assassinated in January 1961 by Belgian agents after UN complicity in the secession of the provinces of Katanga and South Kasai, and a Western power-supported military coup led by Mobutu Sese Seko.

Guy Tillim embarked on this project as the recipient of the first Robert Gardner Fellowship in Photography granted by the Peabody Museum at Harvard University. This exhibition has toured widely in Europe in cities such as Rome, Paris, Amsterdam and will tour in Canada and the United States through 2013.

View Guy Tillim’s bio on Lannan.org.

Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM 2010 - Lannan Foundation

Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM 2010

photo collage from Santa Fe Art Institute
Image: Work by (clockwise from top left): Jennifer Levonian, Patrcia Johanson, Mierle Ukeles, The Yes Men, Will Wilson, and Victoria Sambunaris.
Photo Link.

General Operating Support, 2010
The Santa Fe Art Institute received a grant in support of general operating expenses to carry out its exhibition, residency, lecture, education and community programs. The 2010 program, Elemental: Earth Air Fire Water Art and Environment, featured several artists whose work addresses environmental concerns and promotes local and global awareness.

SFAI offers a robust schedule of events and has featured world-class artists such as Rackstraw Downes, James Drake, Susan York, Tom Joyce, Laurie Anderson, and Victoria Sambunaris.

View Rackstraw Downes’s bio on Lannan.org.
View James Drake’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Susan York’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Victoria Sambunaris’s bio on Lannan.org.

Subhankar Banerjee: Where I Live I Hope to Know Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Subhankar Banerjee: Where I Live I Hope to Know Exhibition

Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, 2010

photo of dead pinon by subhankar banerjeeImage: Subhankar Banerjee, Dead Piñon Where Birds Gather in Autumn; On My Way to the Powerline, 2009. Digital dye coupler print. Courtesy of the artist.
Photo Link.

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art received a grant in support of its exhibition and catalogue, Subhankar Banerjee: Where I Live I Hope to Know, on view from May 14 to August 28, 2011. Over the past four years, Banerjee has created an archive of photographs made within a five-mile perimeter of his home in El Dorado, New Mexico. He began the project with the cholla plant, a cactus that plays an essential role in the ecology of the high desert, then moved on to piñon trees, mostly dead, which create habitats for a vibrant bird culture, and completed the series with images of the New Mexico skies.

This project was born from Banerjee’s curiosity about the range of biodiversity in his immediate surroundings. Where I Live I Hope to Know features fifteen never-before-seen, large color photographs and covers the decimation of old growth piñon trees due to an explosion in the population of bark beetles, a direct result of global warming. In response to his concerns about global warming, Banerjee founded ClimateStoryTellers: A Gathering Place for All Things Global Warming.

View Subhankar Banerjee’s bio and crosslinks on Lannan.org.

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibit - Lannan Foundation

Guy Tillim: Avenue Patrice Lumumba Exhibit

photo by guy tillim og aparatment building bagamoyo
Apartment building, Avenue Bagamoyo, Beira, Mozambique, 2008. Archival pigment ink print on cotton rag paper. 36 x 52 inches. Edition 5 of 9. Collection Lannan Foundation.

Exhibition on view July 23 through September 4, 2011
Gallery Hours: Saturdays & Sundays, 12-5pm (weekends only)
Lannan Foundation Gallery
309 Read Street
Santa Fe, NM

Reception for Artist:
Saturday, July 30th from 5:30 - 7:30pm at the Lannan Gallery

Artist Slide Lecture and Discussion with Adam Hochschild:
Sunday, July 31st at 4pm
Lensic Performing Arts Center

Read Guy Tillim’s bio on Lannan.org.
Read Adam Hochschild’s bio on Lannan.org.
Watch the video of Guy Tillim’s Presentation on Podcast.lannan.org
Watch the video of Guy Tillim in Conversation with Adam Hochchild on Podcast.lannan.org
Photos of Guy Tillim’s work on Flickr

“In many African cities, there are streets, avenues, and squares named after Patrice Lumumba, one of the first elected African leaders of modern times, winning the Congo election after independence from Belgium in 1960… Today his image as a nationalist visionary necessarily remains unmolested by the accusations of abuse of power that became synonymous with later African heads of state.”- Guy Tillim

In May of 1960, Patrice Lumumba, of the Mouvement National Congolais, became the first legally elected Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Less than one month after his election, at celebrations designed to showcase the country’s independence from Belgium, he delivered a passionate and uncompromising denunciation of continued colonial presence in The Congo. In January of the following year, he was assassinated by firing squad under Belgian orders. His name, carried today by countless African streets, avenues, and squares, has come to represent both the idealism and deterioration of a post-colonial African dream for national unity.

In Avenue Patrice Lumumba, Guy Tillim’s photographs bring into focus the inheritance of colonialism on both a grand and minute scale.  Public institutionsor the ruins of themsuch as post offices, schools, administration buildings and, government offices are presented in Tillim’s muted palette. Delicate details come into view through Tillim’s lens: a faded poster promoting HIV/AIDS awareness, long untouched and dusty files, or a local mayor’s handwritten note to himself, “In Life One Must” listing ethical and moral must do’s. Formerly glorious modernist structures, such as the Grande Hotel in Beira, Mozambique, now serve as tenement housing, and a swimming pool at a once posh high school is now empty.

photo by guy tillim city hall lumumbashi
City Hall, Lumumbashi, DR Congo, 2007. Archival pigment ink print on cotton rag paper. 36 x 52 inches. AP 1 of 2. Collection Lannan Foundation.

Though one is tempted to grasp for the “what could have been” in Tillim’s images, he explains,

These photographs are not collapsed histories of post colonial African states or a meditation on aspects of late-modernist era colonial structures, but a walk through avenues of dreams. Patrice Lumumba’s dream, his nationalism, is discernible in the structures, if one reads certain clues, as is the death of his dream, in these de facto monuments. How strange that modernism, which eschewed monument and past for nature and future, should carry such memory so well.

Originally a photojournalist, Guy Tillim has spent a large part of his career documenting social conflict in Africa for media agencies including Reuters and Agence France-Presse. While continuing to focus on the social and natural challenges on the African continent, his working style has evolved into a much more subtle and enigmatic approach. He has photographed child soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, refugees in Angola, and people who live in the high rises of Johannesburg.

As the recipient of the first Robert Gardner Fellowship in Photography granted by the Peabody Museum at Harvard University in 2007, Tillim traveled through Angola, Mozambique, the DR Congo, and Madagascar. He sought not only the action and drama typical of a journalistic approach, but also quieter scenes, allowing his work to straddle the media and fine art worlds.  Of his project Avenue Patrice Lumumba Tillim explains, “Modernist architecture was the hook on which I hung the project, but it is not about that architecture &emdash; it’s not a survey. Rather, these were the places that I had got to know while working as a photojournalist; I had always been struck by the bizarre stage that they provided.”

The History of the Future Travel and Advertising for Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

The History of the Future Travel and Advertising for Exhibition

Julian Cardona, UntitledPhoto: Julián Cardona, Untitled © Julián Cardona. Photo Link.

For over 30 years these artists have focused on the wild places in the desert southwest and the people crossing the lands where Mexico and the United States come together. The exhibition unfolds their multiple collaborations over the last seven years. Cardona’s photographs are of people while Berman’s are of the land in Arizona and New Mexico. Together these images tell a haunting story of life on the border. Both artists are currently represented in Lannan’s art collection. The exhibition was on view in Santa Fe from November 15 to December 31, 2008.

The Santa Fe Art Institute received a grant in support of travel expenses for artists/speakers and for advertising in conjunction with the exhibition The History of the Future: Photographs by Michael Berman and Julián Cardona and Writing by Charles Bowden.

Santa Fe Art Institute
Santa Fe NM

View Michael Berman’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Julián Cardona’s bio on Lannan.org.

Roni Horn aka Roni Horn Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Roni Horn aka Roni Horn Exhibition

Roni Horn, You are the Weather

Roni Horn, You are the Weather

© Roni Horn, detail of You are the Weather. Photo Link.

Whitney Museum of American Art
New York, NY

Ms. Horn’s body of work represents one of the most impressive achievements of any artist to come of age in the wake of Minimalism and Conceptual Art. For nearly 30 years, Horn has developed a body of work in innovative and diverse mediums. This was the most significant overview of Horn’s work to date. The exhibition was created by the Whitney in partnership with the Tate Modern in London, where it debuted on February 25, 2009. Currently Roni Horn is represented in the Lannan Collection by her series of photographs called Still Water (The River Thames for Example), 1999.

The Whitney Museum of American Art received a grant in support of a major exhibition surveying the career of artist Roni Horn, scheduled to open in the fall of 2009.

View Roni Horn’s bio on Lannan.org.

Reimagining Space: The Park Place Gallery Group in 1960s New York Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

Reimagining Space: The Park Place Gallery Group in 1960s New York Exhibition

Mark di Suvero, The A TrainPhoto: Mark di Suvero, The “A” Train, 1965-67. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. Photo Link.

The Park Place Group consisted of five sculptors (Mark di Suvero, Peter Forakis, Robert Grosvenor, Anthony Magar, and Forrest “Frosty” Myers) and five painters (Dean Fleming, Tamara Melcher, David Novros, Edwin Ruda, and Leo Valledor.) The exhibition is an assemblage of these artists’ major works, which have not been seen together since that era. This exhibition is particularly relevant for Lannan Foundation because J. Patrick Lannan, Sr. was close to the group, collected the work of these artists, and hosted them in his home in Palm Beach. Many of the works featured in this exhibition were gifted to the Blanton from the Lannan Collection.

The Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin received a grant in support of the exhibition Reimagining Space: The Park Place Gallery Group in 1960s New York, on view from September 28, 2008 to January 18, 2009.

Blanton Museum of Art
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX

Dismantling Cultural Apartheid Conference - Lannan Foundation

Dismantling Cultural Apartheid Conference

The Santa Fe Art Institute
Photo: The Santa Fe Art Institute.
Photo Link.

Santa Fe Art Institute
Santa Fe, New Mexico

The first gathering, sponsored in a previous grant by Lannan, provided a forum for a discussion about how cultural institutions allow, preserve, and promote apartheid in the cultural and arts sectors in order to maintain market control of the values and placement of minority creativity. SFAI sought support to continue this discussion in hopes of creating a new paradigm for creative institutions and practices that can counter the marketplace forces.

The Santa Fe Art Institute received support to convene a second meeting of artists, scholars, and cultural leaders on the theme of Dismantling Cultural Apartheid.

The History of the Future Exhibition - Lannan Foundation

The History of the Future Exhibition

Michael Berman, Fallen OrdnancePhoto: Michael Berman, Fallen Ordnance, Mohawk Valley, Arizona, 2007. Collection Lannan Foundation. Photo Link.

This exhibition featured the work of photographers Michael Berman and Julián Cardona with an essay by writer Charles Bowden, and served as an important part of the Santa Fe Art Institute’s 2008-2009 programming theme, OUTSIDER: Tourism, Migration, Exile. For over 30 years these artists have focused on the wild places in the desert southwest and the people crossing the lands where Mexico and the United States come together. The exhibition unfolds their multiple collaborations over the last seven years. Cardona’s photographs are of people while Berman’s are of the land in Arizona and New Mexico. Together these images tell a haunting story of life on the border. Both artists are currently represented in Lannan’s art collection.

The Santa Fe Art Institute received support to present the exhibition, The History of the Future, on view November 8 through December 23, 2008.

Santa Fe Art Institute
Santa Fe, New Mexico

View Michael Berman’s bio on Lannan.org.
View Julián Cardona’s bio on Lannan.org.

Jenny Holzer: Protect Protect Exhibition - Lannan Foundation